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I have the following code :

$('.TopNotificationIcon span').remove();    

Can I replace .TopNotificationIcon with this i.e only span exists inside this specific class.

This is the structure

<div class="TopNotificationIcon"><span>xxxxx</span></div>

On click of .TopNotificationIcon, span should be removed.

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2  
not sure to understand exactly what you want? Do you want to test if a span is under a certain class or remove all span under TopNotification in a function? –  Brice Favre May 24 '11 at 15:13
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

if you have click event for .TopNotificationIcon you can do something like this

$('.TopNotificationIcon').click(function(){
    $('span',this).remove();    
});
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+1 This seems to be the best solution to this. –  kapa May 24 '11 at 15:20
    
my error was different but community claims this to be correct. so thanks for the tip hoping it's correct no time to check it out –  Web Developer Jun 1 '11 at 11:44
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Try this...

$('span').remove('.TopNotificationIcon');

This will remove all span elements with the class TopNotificationIcon and also child elements

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This is not what the OP wanted. .TopNotificationIcon is one of the parents of the span to be removed. –  kapa May 24 '11 at 15:16
    
yes you r right @bazmegakapa –  Web Developer May 24 '11 at 15:17
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I would use the find() method, as it seems to be the fastest:

$("div.TopNotificationIcon").click(function() {

    $(this).find("span").remove();    

});
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The context used by @TheSuperTramp is just a shorthand to find(). –  kapa May 24 '11 at 15:22
    
Yes, but that just turns around and does a find(), does it not? So, wouldn't it be more prudent to just use find() directly? –  Code Maverick May 24 '11 at 15:33
    
The difference is so minimal that you should use the one that is more readable and logical to you :). –  kapa May 24 '11 at 20:07
    
@bazmegakapa - The gurus that I listen to always say that find() > context. I know what you are saying, but what is minimal in the simplest form, could be larger in a complex form. So removing an extra operation could be noticeable. –  Code Maverick May 24 '11 at 20:26
    
That's the kind of micro-optimization my gurus keep me away from. –  kapa May 24 '11 at 21:24
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Yes but youd need to change the line to:

$(this).children('span').remove();

js fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/UNhhh/1/

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If you want to remove all span under TopNotification you can do this :

$('div').live('click', function(){
    $(this).children('span').remove();    
});

It will remove all children in a div.

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This is unnecessarily verbose. $('.TopNotificationIcon span').remove(); is quite enough. –  kapa May 24 '11 at 15:21
    
Yeah you're right. There is another proposition. –  Brice Favre May 24 '11 at 15:23
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