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I've been working for years on my personal project, an operating system made from scratch. As you may imagine it's quite complicated stuff. The problem is that I've been working this from scratch many times. Meaning that at some point (quite advanced too, I had hard disk read/write and some basic networking), things were too confused and I decided to throw it all by the window and try again. In the years I've learnt how to make the code look nicer, I read "Clean Code - A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship" by Robert Martin and it helped a lot. I learnt to make functions smaller, organize things in classes (I used C, now C++) and namespaces, appropriate error handling with exceptions and testing. This new approach however got me stuck at the point that I spend most of the time to check that everything is going well, that the code reads well, that is easy, well commented and tested. Basically I'm not making any relevant step from months. When I see my well-written code, it's difficult to add a new functionality and think "where should I put this? Have I already used this piece of code? What would be the best way to do this?" and too often I postpone the work.

So, here's the problem. Do you know any code writing strategy that makes you write working, tested, nice code without spending 90% of time at thinking how to make it working, tested and nice?

Thanks in advance.

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This almost certainly belongs on programmers but i am happy to leave it here to get some attention before migration! –  Tom Anderson May 24 '11 at 15:36
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Sorry I still can't orient in the universe of stackexchange. There are plenty of sites that I often get lost :) –  AlfaOmega08 May 24 '11 at 15:57

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

Do you know any code writing strategy that makes you write working, tested, nice code without spending 90% of time at thinking how to make it working, tested and nice?

Yes, here.

Seriously, no. It is not possible to write good code without thinking.

When I see my well-written code, it's difficult to add a new functionality and think "where should I put this? Have I already used this piece of code? What would be the best way to do this?" and too often I postpone the work.

This is called "analysis paralysis". You might be interested in reading the "Good Enough Software" section of The Pragmatic Programmer. Your code doesn't have to be perfect.

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Those things are widely discussed. To me this legendary blog entry be Joel Spolsky and the follow up discussion (Robert Martin answered this) everywhere an the web contains all the pro and cons and is still fun to read.

To get an idea here's a quote by Jamie Zawinski which appears in the post linked to above:

“At the end of the day, ship the fu****g thing! It’s great to rewrite your code and make it cleaner and by the third time it’ll actually be pretty. But that’s not the point—you’re not here to write code; you’re here to ship products.”

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I suggest you give TDD (test driven development) a run. In this context, you will write automated tests for each piece of functionality before implementing it, then you run the tests after completing the feature.

If the tests pass, then you are done, and can start another feature. As a bonus, the tests will collect over time, and you will soon have a test suite you can use for regression testing (to make sure you haven't broke anything while new coding); this addresses your fear of breaking things in the "nice code".

Also, TDD will let you focus on developing exactly what you need, not more, so it tends to lead to nicer and simpler design (especially in interfaces, since you have to think about interfaces before you start coding, so "thought" drives the interfaces, rather than "whatever happens to be handier when I'm coding it".)

However, be aware that applying automated tests to an OS may provide some amount of technical challenge!

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I think the BDD might be a better way to go. Its basically TDD, but you're writing tests around a single behavior your want your class to enable. Its mainly the same, but there's a mind shift thats more helpful than 'I need to write some tests.' What tests do you write? Thats were BDD is helpful. –  Andy May 24 '11 at 15:34
    
To test my os, I tried to port googletest, which I use for desktop applications. I failed as it depends too much on Linux/Windows and I wasn't able to extract the useful source. So I wrote an incomplete, small but working version of gtest. I actually do many tests but havent really tried TDD yet. However TDD is quite difficult in OS development as, when you run an os, you are actually ruling a processor and changing it's behaviour many times per second. So not everything gets fully testable. Good answer however. –  AlfaOmega08 May 24 '11 at 15:35

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