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Maybe this is been asked many times, but i can't find a solution.

I have a dialog:

class PostDialog(QtGui.QDialog):
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        QtGui.QDialog.__init__(self, parent)
        self.ui = Ui_Dialog() #code from designer!!
        self.ui.setupUi(self)

        self.ui.plainTextEdit = ContentEditor()

This dialog has a QPlainTextEdit from the designer.

I need to override keyPress and keyRelease of that QPlainTextEdit.

So i have subclassed it:

class ContentEditor(QtGui.QPlainTextEdit):

    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        QtGui.QPlainTextEdit.__init__(self, parent)

    def keyPressEvent(self, event):
        print "do something"

but ContentEditor.keyPressEvent is never called! Why?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I recommend using installEventFilter for this purpose:

This would look like:

class PostDialog(QtGui.QDialog):
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        QtGui.QDialog.__init__(self, parent)
        self.ui = Ui_Dialog() #code from designer!!
        self.ui.setupUi(self)

        self.ui.plainTextEdit.installEventFilter(self)

    def eventFilter(self, event):
        if event.type() == QtCore.QEvent.KeyPress:
            # do some stuff ...
            return True # means stop event propagation
        else:
            return QtGui.QDialog.eventFilter(self, event)
share|improve this answer
    
this worked, thanks. there are some syntax errors in your code, but that is the answer. anyway, i don't understand how do that with subclassing yet.. –  apelliciari May 25 '11 at 10:02
    
Sorry for the syntax errors, I wrote it directly without testing ... –  Jeannot May 25 '11 at 11:28

What you're trying to accomplish is better done by promoting in Qt Designer the QPlainTextEdit widget to your subclass ContentEditor.
Qt documentation
In the "Promoted Widgets" Dialog:
"Promote class name": ContentEditor
"Header file": your_python_module_name.h

share|improve this answer
    
that's another good way to do it!! thanx! –  apelliciari May 26 '11 at 8:32

May be you need to call method setFocusPolicyof QWidget to receive a KeyPress Event. From API docs of QWidget for the method keyPressEvent:

This event handler, for event event, can be reimplemented in a subclass 
to receive key press events for the widget. A widget must call setFocusPolicy() 
to accept focus initially and have focus in order to receive a key press event.
share|improve this answer
    
didn't worked for me –  apelliciari May 25 '11 at 10:02
    
You also need to change focus policy of other widgets around it. For example, you can set mywdiget.setFocusPolicy(QtCore.Qt.NoFocus) (in PyQt) to ensure mywidget won't ever have key press functionality. –  Mr. F Jun 7 '11 at 23:05

You'll probably just need to swap the following two lines:

self.ui.setupUi(self)
self.ui.plainTextEdit = ContentEditor()

If you write it like this:

self.ui.plainTextEdit = ContentEditor()
self.ui.setupUi(self)

you make sure your custom widget gets bound before the UI gets setup. Otherwise you're just replacing a reference to an already initialised object.

share|improve this answer
    
this doesn't work because in the setupUi self.ui.plainTextEdit is initialized with a QPlainTextEdit object. –  apelliciari May 25 '11 at 7:35

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