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I have a program that writes output when it's finished, and a specific file takes a very large amount of time, and I was wondering if I could do something to improve its speed.

This file ends up being 25 mbs or more it has around 17000 lines, each line having about 500 fields

the way it works is:

procedure CWaitList.WriteData(AFile : string; AReplicat : integer; AllFields : Boolean);
var
  fout : TextFile;
  idx, ndx : integer;
  MyPat : CPatientItem;
begin
  ndx := FList.Count - 1;
  AssignFile(fout, AFile);
  Append(fout);
  for idx := 0 to ndx do
    begin
      MyPat := CPatientItem(FList.Objects[idx]);
      if not Assigned(MyPat) then Continue;
      MyPat.WriteItem(fout, AReplicat, AllFields);
    end;
  CloseFile(fout);
end;

WriteItem is a procedure that gets all the values from MyPat and writes them to the file, and also calls 3 other functions that also write values to the file

so overall, the WriteData loop ends up being around 1700 and each line ends up having around 500 fields

I was just wondering if there is anything I could do to improve its performance or if it's always going to take a long time because of how much data it has to write

thanks

share|improve this question
    
Would you consider using streams rather than Pascal file I/O? –  David Heffernan May 24 '11 at 16:27
    
Or TStringList with SaveTo File()? But first of all you have to test how fast it is to loop through your data without the file write. –  Matthias Alleweldt May 24 '11 at 16:31
    
Have you run a profiler yet? It will tell you where your program is spending its time. –  Rob Kennedy May 24 '11 at 16:43
    
I ran the debugger and used some timers in the code and the entire WriteData procedure takes 34 seconds, while each iteration of the for loop takes a lot less than 1 second. Obviously 34 seconds isnt that long, but the entire program takes 59 seconds, thats a pretty huge chunk of it. And, of course, the other data set is 65000 lines instead of 17000 so it would take a lot longer –  KingKong May 24 '11 at 17:09
1  
Test your app performance with AQTime. Until you've tested, with AQTime, you won't have all the data you need. –  Warren P May 25 '11 at 0:39

6 Answers 6

The right way to speed up a TextFile is to use SetTextBuf. And perhaps adding {$I-} .... {$I+} around all file access.

var
  TmpBuf: array[word] of byte;

..
  {$I-}
  AssignFile(fout, AFile);
  Append(fout);
  SetTextBuf(fOut,TmpBuf);
  for idx := 0 to ndx do
    begin
      MyPat := CPatientItem(FList.Objects[idx]);
      if not Assigned(MyPat) then Continue;
      MyPat.WriteItem(fout, AReplicat, AllFields);
    end;
  if ioresult<>0 then
    ShowMessage('Error writing file');
  CloseFile(fout);
  {$I+}
end;

In all cases, the old file API is not to be used nowadays...

{$I-} .... {$I+} is to be added also around all your sub routines adding content to the text file.

I've some experiment about huge text file and buffer creation. I've written a dedicated class in the Open Source SynCommons unit, named TTextWriter, which is UTF-8 oriented. I use it in particular for JSON production or LOG writing at highest possible speed. It avoid most temporary heap allocation (e.g. for conversion from an integer value), so it's even very good at multi-thread scaling. Some high-level methods are available to format some text from an open array, like the format() function, but much faster.

Here is the interface of this class:

  /// simple writer to a Stream, specialized for the TEXT format
  // - use an internal buffer, faster than string+string
  // - some dedicated methods is able to encode any data with JSON escape
  TTextWriter = class
  protected
    B, BEnd: PUTF8Char;
    fStream: TStream;
    fInitialStreamPosition: integer;
    fStreamIsOwned: boolean;
    // internal temporary buffer
    fTempBufSize: Integer;
    fTempBuf: PUTF8Char;
    // [0..4] for 'u0001' four-hex-digits template, [5..7] for one UTF-8 char
    BufUnicode: array[0..7] of AnsiChar;
    /// flush and go to next char
    function FlushInc: PUTF8Char;
    function GetLength: integer;
  public
    /// the data will be written to the specified Stream
    // - aStream may be nil: in this case, it MUST be set before using any
    // Add*() method
    constructor Create(aStream: TStream; aBufSize: integer=1024);
    /// the data will be written to an internal TMemoryStream
    constructor CreateOwnedStream;
    /// release fStream is is owned
    destructor Destroy; override;
    /// retrieve the data as a string
    // - only works if the associated Stream Inherits from TMemoryStream: return
    // '' if it is not the case
    function Text: RawUTF8;
    /// write pending data to the Stream
    procedure Flush;
    /// append one char to the buffer
    procedure Add(c: AnsiChar); overload; {$ifdef HASINLINE}inline;{$endif}
    /// append two chars to the buffer
    procedure Add(c1,c2: AnsiChar); overload; {$ifdef HASINLINE}inline;{$endif}
    /// append an Integer Value as a String
    procedure Add(Value: Int64); overload;
    /// append an Integer Value as a String
    procedure Add(Value: integer); overload;
    /// append a Currency from its Int64 in-memory representation
    procedure AddCurr64(Value: PInt64); overload;
    /// append a Currency from its Int64 in-memory representation
    procedure AddCurr64(const Value: Int64); overload;
    /// append a TTimeLog value, expanded as Iso-8601 encoded text
    procedure AddTimeLog(Value: PInt64);
    /// append a TDateTime value, expanded as Iso-8601 encoded text
    procedure AddDateTime(Value: PDateTime); overload;
    /// append a TDateTime value, expanded as Iso-8601 encoded text
    procedure AddDateTime(const Value: TDateTime); overload;
    /// append an Unsigned Integer Value as a String
    procedure AddU(Value: cardinal); 
    /// append a floating-point Value as a String
    // - double precision with max 3 decimals is default here, to avoid rounding
    // problems
    procedure Add(Value: double; decimals: integer=3); overload;
    /// append strings or integers with a specified format
    // - % = #37 indicates a string, integer, floating-point, or class parameter
    // to be appended as text (e.g. class name)
    // - $ = #36 indicates an integer to be written with 2 digits and a comma
    // - £ = #163 indicates an integer to be written with 4 digits and a comma
    // - µ = #181 indicates an integer to be written with 3 digits without any comma
    // - ¤ = #164 indicates CR+LF chars
    // - CR = #13 indicates CR+LF chars
    // - § = #167 indicates to trim last comma
    // - since some of this characters above are > #127, they are not UTF-8
    // ready, so we expect the input format to be WinAnsi, i.e. mostly English
    // text (with chars < #128) with some values to be inserted inside
    // - if StringEscape is false (by default), the text won't be escaped before
    // adding; but if set to true text will be JSON escaped at writing 
    procedure Add(Format: PWinAnsiChar; const Values: array of const;
      Escape: TTextWriterKind=twNone); overload;
    /// append CR+LF chars
    procedure AddCR; {$ifdef HASINLINE}inline;{$endif}
    /// write the same character multiple times
    procedure AddChars(aChar: AnsiChar; aCount: integer);
    /// append an Integer Value as a 2 digits String with comma
    procedure Add2(Value: integer);
    /// append the current date and time, in a log-friendly format
    // - e.g. append '20110325 19241502 '
    // - this method is very fast, and avoid most calculation or API calls
    procedure AddCurrentLogTime;
    /// append an Integer Value as a 4 digits String with comma
    procedure Add4(Value: integer);
    /// append an Integer Value as a 3 digits String without any added comma
    procedure Add3(Value: integer);
    /// append a line of text with CR+LF at the end
    procedure AddLine(const Text: shortstring);
    /// append a String
    procedure AddString(const Text: RawUTF8); {$ifdef HASINLINE}inline;{$endif}
    /// append a ShortString
    procedure AddShort(const Text: ShortString); {$ifdef HASINLINE}inline;{$endif}
    /// append a ShortString property name, as '"PropName":'
    procedure AddPropName(const PropName: ShortString);
    /// append an Instance name and pointer, as '"TObjectList(00425E68)"'+SepChar
    // - Instance must be not nil
    procedure AddInstanceName(Instance: TObject; SepChar: AnsiChar);
    /// append an Instance name and pointer, as 'TObjectList(00425E68)'+SepChar
    // - Instance must be not nil
    procedure AddInstancePointer(Instance: TObject; SepChar: AnsiChar);
    /// append an array of integers as CSV
    procedure AddCSV(const Integers: array of Integer); overload;
    /// append an array of doubles as CSV
    procedure AddCSV(const Doubles: array of double; decimals: integer); overload;
    /// append an array of RawUTF8 as CSV
    procedure AddCSV(const Values: array of RawUTF8); overload;
    /// write some data as hexa chars
    procedure WrHex(P: PAnsiChar; Len: integer);
    /// write some data Base64 encoded
    // - if withMagic is TRUE, will write as '"\uFFF0base64encodedbinary"'
    procedure WrBase64(P: PAnsiChar; Len: cardinal; withMagic: boolean);
    /// write some #0 ended UTF-8 text, according to the specified format
    procedure Add(P: PUTF8Char; Escape: TTextWriterKind); overload;
    /// write some #0 ended UTF-8 text, according to the specified format
    procedure Add(P: PUTF8Char; Len: PtrInt; Escape: TTextWriterKind); overload;
    /// write some #0 ended Unicode text as UTF-8, according to the specified format
    procedure AddW(P: PWord; Len: PtrInt; Escape: TTextWriterKind); overload;
    /// append some chars to the buffer
    // - if Len is 0, Len is calculated from zero-ended char
    // - don't escapes chars according to the JSON RFC
    procedure AddNoJSONEscape(P: Pointer; Len: integer=0);
    /// append some binary data as hexadecimal text conversion
    procedure AddBinToHex(P: Pointer; Len: integer);
    /// fast conversion from binary data into hexa chars, ready to be displayed
    // - using this function with Bin^ as an integer value will encode it
    // in big-endian order (most-signignifican byte first): use it for display
    // - up to 128 bytes may be converted 
    procedure AddBinToHexDisplay(Bin: pointer; BinBytes: integer);
    /// add the pointer into hexa chars, ready to be displayed
    procedure AddPointer(P: PtrUInt);
    /// append some unicode chars to the buffer
    // - WideCharCount is the unicode chars count, not the byte size
    // - don't escapes chars according to the JSON RFC
    // - will convert the Unicode chars into UTF-8
    procedure AddNoJSONEscapeW(P: PWord; WideCharCount: integer);
    /// append some UTF-8 encoded chars to the buffer
    // - if Len is 0, Len is calculated from zero-ended char
    // - escapes chars according to the JSON RFC
    procedure AddJSONEscape(P: Pointer; Len: PtrInt=0); overload;
    /// append some UTF-8 encoded chars to the buffer, from a generic string type
    // - faster than AddJSONEscape(pointer(StringToUTF8(string))
    // - if Len is 0, Len is calculated from zero-ended char
    // - escapes chars according to the JSON RFC
    procedure AddJSONEscapeString(const s: string); {$ifdef UNICODE}inline;{$endif}
    /// append some Unicode encoded chars to the buffer
    // - if Len is 0, Len is calculated from zero-ended widechar
    // - escapes chars according to the JSON RFC
    procedure AddJSONEscapeW(P: PWord; Len: PtrInt=0);
    /// append an open array constant value to the buffer
    // - "" will be added if necessary
    // - escapes chars according to the JSON RFC
    // - very fast (avoid most temporary storage)
    procedure AddJSONEscape(const V: TVarRec); overload;
    /// append a dynamic array content as UTF-8 encoded JSON array
    // - expect a dynamic array TDynArray wrapper as incoming parameter
    // - TIntegerDynArray, TInt64DynArray, TCardinalDynArray, TDoubleDynArray,
    // TCurrencyDynArray, TWordDynArray and TByteDynArray will be written as
    // numerical JSON values
    // - TRawUTF8DynArray, TWinAnsiDynArray, TRawByteStringDynArray,
    // TStringDynArray, TWideStringDynArray, TSynUnicodeDynArray, TTimeLogDynArray,
    // and TDateTimeDynArray will be written as escaped UTF-8 JSON strings
    // (and Iso-8601 textual encoding if necessary)
    // - any other kind of dynamic array (including array of records) will be
    // written as Base64 encoded binary stream, with a JSON_BASE64_MAGIC prefix
    // (UTF-8 encoded \uFFF0 special code)
    // - examples: '[1,2,3,4]' or '["\uFFF0base64encodedbinary"]'
    procedure AddDynArrayJSON(const DynArray: TDynArray);
    /// append some chars to the buffer in one line
    // - P should be ended with a #0
    // - will write #1..#31 chars as spaces (so content will stay on the same line)
    procedure AddOnSameLine(P: PUTF8Char); overload;
    /// append some chars to the buffer in one line
    // - will write #0..#31 chars as spaces (so content will stay on the same line)
    procedure AddOnSameLine(P: PUTF8Char; Len: PtrInt); overload;
    /// append some wide chars to the buffer in one line
    // - will write #0..#31 chars as spaces (so content will stay on the same line)
    procedure AddOnSameLineW(P: PWord; Len: PtrInt); 
    /// serialize as JSON the given object
    // - this default implementation will write null, or only write the
    // class name and pointer if FullExpand is true - use TJSONSerializer.
    // WriteObject method for full RTTI handling
    // - default implementation will write TList/TCollection/TStrings/TRawUTF8List
    // as appropriate array of class name/pointer (if FullExpand=true) or string
    procedure WriteObject(Value: TObject; HumanReadable: boolean=false;
      DontStoreDefault: boolean=true; FullExpand: boolean=false); virtual;
    /// the last char appended is canceled
    procedure CancelLastChar; {$ifdef HASINLINE}inline;{$endif}
    /// the last char appended is canceled if it was a ','
    procedure CancelLastComma; {$ifdef HASINLINE}inline;{$endif}
    /// rewind the Stream to the position when Create() was called
    procedure CancelAll;
    /// count of add byte to the stream
    property TextLength: integer read GetLength;
    /// the internal TStream used for storage
    property Stream: TStream read fStream write fStream;
  end;

As you can see, there is even some serialization available, and the CancelLastComma / CancelLastChar methods are very useful to produce fast JSON or CSV data from a loop.

About speed and timing, this routine is faster than my disk access, which is around 100 MB / s. I think it can achieve around 500 MB / s when appending data in a TMemoryStream instead of a TFileStream.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, it seems like using a buffer doesn't speed it up at all. I'll try using TFileStream –  KingKong May 24 '11 at 18:18
    
naive use of TFileStream won't help. You'll need buffering these too. Can your disk go any faster? –  David Heffernan May 24 '11 at 23:04
    
@David You're perfectly right. TFileStream is just a wrapper around the Windows file API, so it can be slow when you append some small content each time a Write() is called. Buffering is one key here. Another possibility should be to use TMemoryStream then SaveToFile (under Delphi 6/7 TMemoryStream uses slow GlobalAlloc API - don't use it). That's exactly what our TTextWriter class does. And the FileText functions are fast, when used with a big buffer. The bottleneck should be in the sub routines, not in the technique used for appending data to the text content. –  Arnaud Bouchez May 25 '11 at 5:12

I haven't done it in a while, but you should be able to set a bigger text I/O buffer like this:

var
  fout : TextFile;
  idx, ndx : integer;
  MyPat : CPatientItem;
  Buffer: array[0..65535] of char; // 64K - example
begin
  ndx := FList.Count - 1;
  AssignFile(fout, AFile);
  SetTextBuf(fout, Buffer);
  Append(fout);
share|improve this answer

Use Process Explorer from SysInternals to watch the output. I think you'll see that you're writing thousands or millions of little chunks. Using streaming I/O, where you write in one I/O operation, will dramatically improve things.

http://live.sysinternals.com/procexp.exe

share|improve this answer
    
The TextFile output is already buffered, but the initial buffer size if only 128 bytes. Increase the internal buffer size will reduce the time spent in the Windows file kernel. Textfile implementation, even if it is an old techno, use some kind of streaming I/O. –  Arnaud Bouchez May 26 '11 at 6:00

When I was working on a archive package, I noticed a performance boost when I was writing chunks of 512 bytes each, which is a default size of a disk sector. Note that the size of a disk sector and the size of a file system's block are two different things! There are WinAPI functions, which will get your partition's block size - have a look here.

share|improve this answer

I'd suggest switching to TFileStream or TMemoryStream rather than older style file i/o. If you use a TFileStream, you can set the size of the file once based on an estimate of what you'll need, rather than having the program search for the next empty block of space to use for each write. You can then extend it or truncate it as needed. If you use a TMemoryStream - save the data to that and use SaveToFile() - the whole thing will be written out from memory to a file at one time. That should speed things up for you.

share|improve this answer

I suspect the writing time is NOT the problem. The time-consuming part of the routine is streaming out the 500 fields. You can test this by substituting the field streaming mecahanism with a constant string of equivalent length. I will guarantee that this will be much faster. So, to optimise the routine, you need to optimise the field streaming, not the actual write!

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