Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

There are two methods, one of which returns a data using LINQ within a using statement. I wonder if it's possible for the query to throw some sort of an exception because the query execution is deferred and a variable it's using has already been disposed?

class Foo
{
    void Bar()
    {
       var bazResult = Baz();
       //... use bazResult here...
    }

    IEnumerable<int> Baz()
    {
        using (var d = new SomeDisposableSource())
        {
            return d.Select(e => e.Id);
        }
    }

}

BTW, it must have been asked already in some form but I can't find the obvious candidate. So don't kick me too hard :)

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think you will have an exception if the object is disposed. This thread is very similar and gives a couple of methods for handling the problem. The simple one is to force execution by doing a return d.Select(e => e.Id).ToList() but that might not be suitable for you

share|improve this answer
    
I see, it makes sense. It also means that if I really want to avoid any overhead of execution (say, because I have IF statement in Bar that leads to no use of bazResult) then I'd rather avoid such constructs all together. –  Schultz9999 May 24 '11 at 17:58

Yes, it can throw an exception, but it depends on the implementation of "SomeDisposableSource". You are asking the source to get an IEnumerable or an Array before calling the Dispose(), but you are actually enumerating each element after the Dispose, so if it throws and exception or not depends on the actual code for that "yeld-return" code. (does it use any disposed objects?)

You can work around it, (with higher memory usage) by doing:

return d.Select(e => e.Id).ToArray();

That way, all the enumeration is finished before you the Dispose() is executed.

EDIT: Using:

return d.Select(e => e.Id).ToList();

...may be better.

share|improve this answer
    
Also ToList() is better than ToArray(), as you avoid Array.Copy –  Magnus May 24 '11 at 16:39
    
@Magnus: Array.Copy() is what List.Add() uses when it needs to resize the underlying storage. So no, you don't avoid it. –  Pavel Minaev May 24 '11 at 16:59
    
@Pavel thats true, but ToArray() also does it. (check with reflector) –  Magnus May 24 '11 at 18:59

whether it's possible is kind of strange question. Yes, it is possible. Your SomeDisposableSource may check whether it was disposed or not in GetEnumerator method.

share|improve this answer
    
Not so strange if you put it into real context. There may be much more code within using statement with the return in the end performing final filtering. –  Schultz9999 May 24 '11 at 17:55

I think Gerardo is on the right track but I would code it a bit differently which might result in a smaller memory footprint:

return d.Select(e => e.Id).ToList();

EDIT: Oops! IndigoDelta is way ahead of me

share|improve this answer
    
It's not ToList vs. ToArray it's WHERE they're called. d.ToArray/d.ToList might be much bigger becuase all of 'd' is written to the array/list vs. just the result of the select. –  n8wrl May 24 '11 at 16:38
    
Ok, got it, also fixed my answer. –  Gerardo Grignoli May 24 '11 at 16:42

You're mixing up the (more) deterministic using statement with a (less deterministic) LINQ statement. By wrapping the resource d in that using statement you are explicitly stating that by the end of the method you would like it to be disposed.

Therefore if you would like to ensure d is disposed prior to the exit of the method, you'll have to make the LINQ execution immediate with ToArray, ToList, or some other method of that variety.

The much harderslightly more involved (per commenter) path would be to create a custom IEnumerable<T> which allowed the resource (d) to be returned with the LINQ statement and be executed at a later time, i.e. the caller is now responsible for disposing the IEnumerable<T> (usually simply through using a foreach block).

share|improve this answer
    
It's not really all that much harder - an iterator method (yield return) with a using inside it would do just that. –  Pavel Minaev May 24 '11 at 17:01
    
Hah, thank you sir. I've been wearing a DBA hat recently, forgetting about the simple solutions. –  user7116 May 24 '11 at 17:03

In fact the execution is not deferred in your code because you use a regular return. So the Baz method executes, returns and dispose. Later on, when you'll enumerate on the result, if this enumeration mechanism relies on unmanaged resources which have been disposed (which is most likely the case in your sample), this will fail.

The workaround is simple : don't prevent the deferred execution with a return but use a yield return instead. It's the accurate keyword to make deferred execution.

Your method becomes this

    IEnumerable<int> Baz()
    {
        using (var d = new SomeDisposableSource())
        {
            //return d.Select(e => e.Id); //Baaaad ! No proper deferred execution
            foreach (var i in d.Select(e => e.Id)) yield return i; //Proper deferred execution
        }
    }

and then all is ok. The using doesn't invoke the Dispose method before the enumeration is complete.

share|improve this answer
    
To complete this answer with a clearer explanation of what is at work, with yield return, an enumerated item is returned one by one till the end, and then Dispose is called. With return, an iterator is immediately returned and Disposeis called just after. But this iterator is not iterated on, and is not an instance of the type enumerated, but an instance of a "hidden" class which allow to enumerate the enumerated type. Thus we have (return = returning an enumerator of T instances with immediate execution) vs. (yield return = returning a T instance with deferred execution) –  Ssithra May 24 '11 at 20:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.