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Is there a way to prevent a std::set< Object*>.erase(it) function to delete memory? I only want the Object* to be removed from the set, without freeing memory..

To be specific, I have an object that removes himself from the set and puts itself to another. And it crashes.

set1.insert(this);    
set1.erase(set1.find(this));
set2.insert(this);

Anyone able to reproduce this? thank you!

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3  
can't you use a set< Object* > in the first place? It would require you to handle the lifetime managment yourself though.. –  stijn May 24 '11 at 16:42
4  
What is the type of your std::set? std::set<Object> or std::set<Object*> ? –  GWW May 24 '11 at 16:42
    
@GWW it is a std::set< Object*> –  Inuart May 24 '11 at 16:54
    
Are you 100% confident that when set1.erase(set1.find(this)) is called, this is actually present in set1? –  NPE May 24 '11 at 17:13
    
@aix yes it is.. I use it in other parts of the class –  Inuart May 24 '11 at 17:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your set<Object*> already doesn't delete the pointed-to object when you call the erase for the iterator. If it's crashing in that area it's for another reason. Likely causes are:

  • You're using the iterator after you erase the item.
  • Missing/incorrect destructor.
  • Missing/incorrect copy constructor/copy assignment operator.
  • Unrelated problems with the heap such as double deletes.
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I think it would be ok if it just allow me to fire the pointer without worrying about the destructor.. also I don't use deletes in my code now.. –  Inuart May 24 '11 at 17:38
    
maybe you are right and I'm just too silly to make it work properly.. Thanks to all of you again! –  Inuart May 25 '11 at 21:07
    
Fixed now. Your first guess was right: THE ITERATOR XD thank you! –  Inuart May 25 '11 at 22:33

Since you are storing raw pointers in the set, you don't need to do anything special: the memory won't be freed when you call erase.

As to what might be causing the crash, please post some relevant code and some details of where exactly it's crashing.

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That is already what happens.

The element — the pointer — is destroyed. There is no magic that also deletes the thing it's pointing to.

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then I don't know what is happening to me XD thank you anyway –  Inuart May 24 '11 at 17:15
    
@Inuart: No worries. Good luck! –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 24 '11 at 17:18

What's in your set ? QObject* ? If so erase should only free your pointer not the instance it is pointing to ... Your are taking about a tree ? Is that your set you meaning ?

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yes I talk about the set –  Inuart May 24 '11 at 16:56

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