Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can someone show me how to implement a recursive lambda expression to traverse a tree structure in C#.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 46 down vote accepted

Ok, I found some free time finally.
Here we go:

class TreeNode
{
    public string Value { get; set;}
    public List<TreeNode> Nodes { get; set;}


    public TreeNode()
    {
        Nodes = new List<TreeNode>();
    }
}

Action<TreeNode> traverse = null;

traverse = (n) => { Console.WriteLine(n.Value); n.Nodes.ForEach(traverse);};

var root = new TreeNode { Value = "Root" };
root.Nodes.Add(new TreeNode { Value = "ChildA"} );
root.Nodes[0].Nodes.Add(new TreeNode { Value = "ChildA1" });
root.Nodes[0].Nodes.Add(new TreeNode { Value = "ChildA2" });
root.Nodes.Add(new TreeNode { Value = "ChildB"} );
root.Nodes[1].Nodes.Add(new TreeNode { Value = "ChildB1" });
root.Nodes[1].Nodes.Add(new TreeNode { Value = "ChildB2" });

traverse(root);
share|improve this answer
    
IIRC the ForEach extension method doesn't exist in the Framework, so you have to write it yourself (which is an easy task). –  VVS Nov 26 '10 at 18:14
2  
@VVS it exists in List<> msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bwabdf9z.aspx –  onof Jul 3 '12 at 6:23
    
that was....AWESOME!!! –  Timmerz Aug 23 '12 at 18:47

@aku's links show the proper solution. A simple alternative is to “go back in time” to the antics of C and C++: declaration before definition. Try the following:

Func<int, int> fact = null;
fact = x => (x == 0) ? 1 : x * fact(x - 1);

Works like a charm.

share|improve this answer
2  
Out of curiosity, how this factorial function can help to answer on given question? –  aku Sep 14 '08 at 10:46
2  
because it's recursive –  Guillaume86 Nov 11 '13 at 12:10

A simple alternative is to “go back in time” to the antics of C and C++: declaration before definition. Try the following:

Func<int, int> fact = null;
fact = x => (x == 0) ? 1 : x * fact(x - 1);

Works like a charm.

Yes, that does work, with one little caveat. C# has mutable references. So make sure you don't accidentally do something like this:

Func<int, int> fact = null;
fact = x => (x == 0) ? 1 : x * fact(x - 1);

// Make a new reference to the factorial function
Func<int, int> myFact = fact;

// Use the new reference to calculate the factorial of 4
myFact(4); // returns 24

// Modify the old reference
fact = x => x;

// Again, use the new reference to calculate
myFact(4); // returns 12

Of course, this example is a bit contrived, but this could happen when using mutable references. If you use the combinators from aku's links, this won't be possible.

share|improve this answer

Assuming a mythical object TreeItem, that conatins a Children collection to represent your hierarchy.

    public void HandleTreeItems(Action<TreeItem> item, TreeItem parent)
    {
        if (parent.Children.Count > 0)
        {
            foreach (TreeItem ti in parent.Children)
            {
                HandleTreeItems(item, ti);
            }
        }

        item(parent);
    }

Now to call it, passing in the lambda that handles one item, by printing its name to the console.

HandleTreeItems(item => { Console.WriteLine(item.Name); }, TreeItemRoot);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.