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I've a program where the loop in question looks something like this

int numOfWords = 1000;
int avgSizeOfWord = 20;
while(all documents are not read) {
    char[][] wordsInDoc = new char[numOfWords][avgSizeOfWord];
    for(int i=0; i<numWordsInDoc; i++) {
        wordsInDoc[i] = getNextWord();
    }
    processWords(wordsInDoc);
}

I was wondering what happens behind the scene when this loop gets executed. When does the garbage collector collect the memory that has been assigned for each document? Is their a better way (wrt memory usage) to do the same?

Any insight is appreciated.

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Take a look at: stackoverflow.com/questions/4138200/… – Andrey Adamovich May 24 '11 at 18:27
    
Java has a non deterministic garbage collector, which means there's no way to predict its behaviour just by looking at a piece of code. – Etienne de Martel May 24 '11 at 18:27
    
your question is arguably more about the JIT than the GC algorithm, i.e. if this code get compiled by the JIT then what does that version of your code look like? for example what does processWords do? will it get inlined? if it does, will wordsInDoc get hoisted outside the loop? is there any chance it get hoisted anyway? and probably some other possible avenues for compilation too... – Matt May 24 '11 at 19:10
    
@Matt I need to look into the workings of JIT as I'm completely unaware of that. But I did not get the meaning of this particular sentence if it does, will wordsInDoc get hoisted outside the loop? Say, processWords writes the words to a file, what is the scenario then? – kprotocol May 25 '11 at 6:46
    
I suggest reading TS-5427 from this pack -- download.oracle.com/javaone/javaone2009-core-se.zip -- which is the JavaOne talk on "Inside Out - A Modern Virtual Machine Revealed" – Matt May 25 '11 at 9:57
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well you're definitely wasting memory - you're allocating all of the "sub-arrays" and then overwriting them. You'd be better off with:

while(all documents are not read) {
    char[][] wordsInDoc = new char[numOfWords][];
    for(int i=0; i < numWordsInDoc; i++) {
        wordsInDoc[i] = getNextWord();
    }
    processWords(wordsInDoc);
}

Now what does processWords actually do? If it doesn't stash the array anywhere, you could reuse it:

char[][] wordsInDoc = new char[numOfWords][];
while(all documents are not read) {
    for(int i=0; i < numWordsInDoc; i++) {
        wordsInDoc[i] = getNextWord();
    }
    processWords(wordsInDoc);
}

I would definitely perform the first change, but probably not the second.

As for when exactly garbage collection occurs - that's implementation-specific.

share|improve this answer
    
@kprotocol: If the words are being read in, processed and written out very quickly, they'll probably never get past the first generation, so won't be too bad in terms of GC hit. If getNextWord is already allocating a char array, that's got its own hit. Now if you could reuse all of those arrays as well (perhaps using a Unicode null character to indicate the end of the word) you may be able to almost completely eliminate allocation. On the other hand, do you have any evidence that this is a significant performance bottleneck? (Continued.) – Jon Skeet May 25 '11 at 6:21
    
I usually write the simplest code I can first, and then profile it to work out where to optimize. It helps if you have a realistic load to test first - and a concrete performance requirement (not just "as fast as possible") so that you know when you're done. – Jon Skeet May 25 '11 at 6:22

It is impossible to answer your question in general, as the JVM can pretty much do whatever it wants with regards to garbage collection.

You might be able to gain some insight into what actually happens by running your program under a memory profiler such as YourKit. This will also enable you to compare different strategies (e.g. using the String class instead of char arrays) in terms of memory usage and time spent in the garbage collector.

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It is likely you are creating array you are immediately destroying. A more efficient approach is to create the plain array of arrays, or use a List.

char[][] wordsInDoc = new char[numOfWords][];
for(int i=0; i<numWordsInDoc; i++) {
    wordsInDoc[i] = getNextWord();
}
processWords(wordsInDoc);

OR

List<char[]> wordsInDoc = new ArrayList<char[]>();
for(int i=0; i<numWordsInDoc; i++) {
    wordsInDoc.add(getNextWord());
}
processWords(wordsInDoc);

OR use Strings

String line = "Hello World. This is a Sentence";
String[] words = line.split(" +");
processWords(words);
share|improve this answer

The garbage collector works in mysterious ways. Even calling it directly results in merely a suggestion.

If you want to find out when an object is garbage collected you can override finalize() and log output information on the time.

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My few cents :)

  1. I guess when you declare an array, unlike in C/C++ you don't actually reserve memory for the object but you simple create that many references.
  2. Each reference might occupy a certain memory (which will surly be less that the memory occupied by the object its pointing to). So it should not matter if you use plain array or ArrayList (which do the same thing but in a type safe way).
  3. The very basic problem with the approach mentioned is that it loads the entire document in memory and sends it for processing.
  4. Better/Efficient way to stream it out (Buffered) and then process it on the fly. This will prevent the entire document from being loaded in memory.

Regarding GC, as folks here have pointed out, its impossible to predict. It kicks in whenever JVM is running short of memory but that just a cliche sentence :).

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