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I want to write an if/else statement that tests if the value of a text input does NOT equal either one of two different values. Like this (excuse my pseudo-English code):

var test = $("#test").val();
if (test does not equal A or B){
    do stuff;
}
else {
    do other stuff;
}

How do I write the condition for the if statement on line 2?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 35 down vote accepted

Think of ! (negation operator) as "not", || (boolean-or operator) as "or" and && (boolean-and operator) as "and". See Operators and Operator Precedence.

Thus:

if(!(a || b)) {
  // means neither a nor b
}

However, using DeMorgan's Law, it could be written as:

if(!a && !b) {
  // is not a and is not b
}

a and b above can be any expression (such as test == 'B' or whatever it needs to be).

Once again, if test == 'A' and test == 'B', are the expressions, note the expansion of the 1st form:

// if(!(a || b)) 
if(!((test == 'A') || (test == 'B')))
// or more simply, removing the inner parenthesis as
// || and && have a lower precedence than comparison and negation operators
if(!(test == 'A' || test == 'B'))
// and using DeMorgan's, we can turn this into
// this is the same as substituting into if(!a && !b)
if(!(test == 'A') && !(test == 'B'))
// and this can be simplified as !(x == y) is the same as (x != y)
if(test != 'A' && test != 'B')

Happy coding

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3  
+1 for DeMorgan's laws –  Rocket Hazmat May 24 '11 at 19:40

In general it would be something like this:

if(test != "A" && test != "B")

You should probably read up on javascript logical operators.

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I do that using jQuery

if ( 0 > $.inArray( test, [a,b] ) ) { ... }
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4  
-1 Needs to test for $.inArray(test, [a,b]) === -1 –  Raynos May 24 '11 at 19:56
1  
Good, fair-play. Thanks for clearing things up! –  Zlatev May 24 '11 at 20:30
    
If anyone continues to get undesired results with this then you can also check that the typeof of the test and a, b must match too if you need to get true as result. –  Bhumi Singhal Apr 2 '13 at 5:33
var test = $("#test").val();
if (test != 'A' && test != 'B'){
    do stuff;
}
else {
    do other stuff;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
You mean test != A && test != B, else it will always execute (unless test == A == B) –  Konerak May 24 '11 at 19:33
    
@Konerak, the OP said or –  Neal May 24 '11 at 19:34
    
@Neal: the OP wants the code executed if the value does NOT equal either one of two -> either one! –  Konerak May 24 '11 at 19:35
    
@Neal: The if() in this answer will always be true because test will always not equal one or the other. –  user113716 May 24 '11 at 19:35
    
Maybe I'm just misunderstanding the meaning of if (test does not equal A or B) in the OPs context, but imo it feels better to be coded as if (test != 'A' && test != 'B'). –  Jürgen Thelen May 24 '11 at 19:36

You used the word "or" in your pseudo code, but based on your first sentence, I think you mean and. There was some confusion about this because that is not how people usually speak.

You want:

var test = $("#test").val();
if (test != 'A' && test != 'B'){
    do stuff;
}
else {
    do other stuff;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That did the trick! Yes, you're right, the wording was a little weird. I couldn't think of a better way to explain it. –  daGUY May 24 '11 at 20:10

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