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[Flags]
public enum MyEnum
{
    None = 0,
    Setting1 = (1 << 1),
    Setting2 = (1 << 2),
    Setting3 = (1 << 3),
    Setting4 = (1 << 4),
}

I need to be able to somehow loop over every posible setting and pass the settings combination to a function. Sadly I have been unable to figure out how to do this

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1  
    
That would get all settings, but not all combinations. Remember this is flags so you can have both Setting1 and Setting2. –  EKS May 24 '11 at 21:24
    
Isn't that just a matter of how you write the loop... –  forsvarir May 24 '11 at 21:24
1  
@Ryan, this is not a dupe, as the other quesions does not cover combinations of flags, however it is a great link –  Ian Ringrose May 24 '11 at 21:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Not tested, use at your own risk, but should solve the problem generically enough. BTW I have no idea why System.Enum is not a valid restriction. So sorry for the ugly casting. It is also not horribly efficient but unless you are running this against a dynamically generated type it should only ever have to be done once per execution (or once period if saved).

public static List<T> GetAllEnums<T>()
    where T : struct
{
    if (typeof(T).BaseType != typeof(Enum)) throw new ArgumentException("T must be an Enum type");

    var values = Enum.GetValues(typeof(T)).Cast<int>().ToArray();
    var valuesInverted = values.Select(v => ~v).ToArray(); 
    var result = new List<T>();
    int max = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < values.Length; i++)
    {
        max |= values[i];
    }

    for (int i = 0; i <= max; i++)
    {
        int unaccountedBits = i;
        for (int j = 0; j < valuesInverted.Length; j++)
        {
            unaccountedBits &= valuesInverted[j];
            if (unaccountedBits == 0)
            {
                result.Add((T)(object)i);
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    //Check for zero
    try
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(Enum.GetName(typeof(T), (T)(object)0)))
        {
            result.Remove((T)(object)0);
        }
    }
    catch
    {
        result.Remove((T)(object)0);
    }

    return result;
}

This works by getting all the values and ORing them together, rather than summing, in case there are composite numbers included. Then it takes every integer up to the maximum and masking them with the reverse of each Flag, this causes valid bits to become 0, allowing us to identify those bits that are impossible.

The check at the end is for missing zero from an Enum. You can remove it if you are fine with always including a zero enum in the results.

Gave the expected result of 15 when given an enum containing 2,4,6,32,34,16384.

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Sorry for being a amature here, but how do you call this function? –  EKS May 25 '11 at 14:25
    
The enum type is passed as a type parameter, in your example: GetAllEnums<MyEnum>() note that you would need to place it in a class, and likely preface it with that class name, for instance if it were in a static class called Utility, then Utility.GetAllEnums<MyEnum>(). –  Guvante May 25 '11 at 17:52

Here is a solution particular to your code sample, using a simple for loop (don't use, see update below)

int max = (int)(MyEnum.Setting1 | MyEnum.Setting2 | MyEnum.Setting3 | MyEnum.Setting4);
for (int i = 0; i <= max; i++)
{
    var value = (MyEnum)i;
    SomeOtherFunction(value);
}

Update: Here is a generic method that will return all possible combinations. And thank @David Yaw for the idea to use a queue to build up every combination.

IEnumerable<T> AllCombinations<T>() where T : struct
{
    // Constuct a function for OR-ing together two enums
    Type type = typeof(T);
    var param1 = Expression.Parameter(type);
    var param2 = Expression.Parameter(type);
    var orFunction = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, T, T>>(
        Expression.Convert(
            Expression.Or(
                Expression.Convert(param1, type.GetEnumUnderlyingType()),
                Expression.Convert(param2, type.GetEnumUnderlyingType())),
            type), param1, param2).Compile();

    var initalValues = (T[])Enum.GetValues(type);
    var discoveredCombinations = new HashSet<T>(initalValues);
    var queue = new Queue<T>(initalValues);

    // Try OR-ing every inital value to each value in the queue
    while (queue.Count > 0)
    {
        T a = queue.Dequeue();
        foreach (T b in initalValues)
        {
            T combo = orFunction(a, b);
            if (discoveredCombinations.Add(combo))
                queue.Enqueue(combo);
        }
    }

    return discoveredCombinations;
}
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This works in the given case, but will not work if there are some powers of 2 that are not members smaller then the largest member. –  Ian Ringrose May 24 '11 at 21:29
    
MyEnum.Setting4 wouldn't be high enough, you would need setting1 &2&3&4 would you not? –  dnolan May 24 '11 at 21:29
    
@dnolan - Thank you for pointing that out, how dense of me. I have fixed my answer. –  Greg May 24 '11 at 21:31
    
@Ian - No argument there. A generalizable solution would be more complex. –  Greg May 24 '11 at 21:32
    
@Greg no problem, as @Ian points out, this solution would work if the assumption is made that all flags are used within that range, if one is missing it would break down. –  dnolan May 24 '11 at 21:33
    public IEnumerable<TEnum> AllCombinations<TEnum>() where TEnum : struct
    {
        Type enumType = typeof (TEnum);
        if (!enumType.IsEnum)
            throw new ArgumentException(string.Format("The type {0} does not represent an enumeration.", enumType), "TEnum");

        if (enumType.GetCustomAttributes(typeof (FlagsAttribute), true).Length > 0) //Has Flags attribute
        {
            var allCombinations = new HashSet<TEnum>();

            var underlyingType = Enum.GetUnderlyingType(enumType);
            if (underlyingType == typeof (sbyte) || underlyingType == typeof (short) || underlyingType == typeof (int) || underlyingType == typeof (long))
            {
                long[] enumValues = Array.ConvertAll((TEnum[]) Enum.GetValues(enumType), value => Convert.ToInt64(value));
                for (int i = 0; i < enumValues.Length; i++)
                    FillCombinationsRecursive(enumValues[i], i + 1, enumValues, allCombinations);
            }
            else if (underlyingType == typeof (byte) || underlyingType == typeof (ushort) || underlyingType == typeof (uint) || underlyingType == typeof (ulong))
            {
                ulong[] enumValues = Array.ConvertAll((TEnum[]) Enum.GetValues(enumType), value => Convert.ToUInt64(value));
                for (int i = 0; i < enumValues.Length; i++)
                    FillCombinationsRecursive(enumValues[i], i + 1, enumValues, allCombinations);
            }
            return allCombinations;
        }
        //No Flags attribute
        return (TEnum[]) Enum.GetValues(enumType);
    }

    private void FillCombinationsRecursive<TEnum>(long combination, int start, long[] initialValues, HashSet<TEnum> combinations) where TEnum : struct
    {
        combinations.Add((TEnum)Enum.ToObject(typeof(TEnum), combination));
        if (combination == 0)
            return;

        for (int i = start; i < initialValues.Length; i++)
        {
            var nextCombination = combination | initialValues[i];
            FillCombinationsRecursive(nextCombination, i + 1, initialValues, combinations);
        }
    }

    private void FillCombinationsRecursive<TEnum>(ulong combination, int start, ulong[] initialValues, HashSet<TEnum> combinations) where TEnum : struct
    {
        combinations.Add((TEnum)Enum.ToObject(typeof(TEnum), combination));
        if (combination == 0)
            return;

        for (int i = start; i < initialValues.Length; i++)
        {
            var nextCombination = combination | initialValues[i];
            FillCombinationsRecursive(nextCombination, i + 1, initialValues, combinations);
        }
    }
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2  
Please add some text to explain the code. Does it have to be that long? –  krlmlr Oct 24 '12 at 20:56
    
Well, in the first methode AllCombinations, first of all I check if the type is Enum. Then I want to be shure that it has Flags attribute.If so, I analyze underlying type, which can be any integral type. If it is one of signed integers, I cast to the largest signed one (long) in order to not lose data. If it is one of unsigned integers, I cast to the largest unsigned one (ulong). After that I just call recursive function which does the job. The second and the third methods are almost identical except the types of input parameters. I could not use generic type because of bitwise OR operator. –  Aleksei Oct 25 '12 at 23:11

First, grab a list of all the individual values. Since you've got 5 values, that's (1 << 5) = 32 combinations, so iterate from 1 to 31. (Don't start at zero, that would mean to include none of the enum values.) When iterating, examine the bits in the number, every one bit in the iteration variable means to include that enum value. Put the results into a HashSet, so that there aren't duplicates, since including the 'None' value doesn't change the resulting enum.

List<MyEnum> allValues = new List<MyEnum>(Enum.Getvalues(typeof(MyEnum)));
HashSet<MyEnum> allCombos = new Hashset<MyEnum>();

for(int i = 1; i < (1<<allValues.Count); i++)
{
    MyEnum working = (MyEnum)0;
    int index = 0;
    int checker = i;
    while(checker != 0)
    {
        if(checker & 0x01 == 0x01) working |= allValues[index];
        checker = checker >> 1;
        index++;
    }
    allCombos.Add(working);
}
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I usually don't want to update each variable representing the max of an enumeration, when I add a new member to an enumeration. For example I dislike the statement Greg proposed:

int max = (int)(MyEnum.Setting1 | MyEnum.Setting2 | ... | MyEnum.SettingN);

Consider when you have several of these variabeles scattered throughout your solution and you decide to modify your enumeration. That surely isn't a desirable scenario.

I will admit in advance that my code is slower, but it is automatically correct after an enumeration has been modified, and I strive to code in such a robust manner. I'm willing to pay some computational penalty for that, C# is all about that anywayz. I propose:

public static IEnumerable<T> GetAllValues<T>() where T : struct
{
    if (!typeof(T).IsEnum) throw new ArgumentException("Generic argument is not an enumeration type");
    int maxEnumValue = (1 << Enum.GetValues(typeof(T)).Length) - 1;
    return Enumerable.Range(0, maxEnumValue).Cast<T>();
}

This assumes the enumeration contains members for all powers of 2 up to a certain power(including 0), exactly like a flag-enumeration is usually used.

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