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I don't understand why the following does not work:

queue<int*> q;

int counter = 1;
for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    int a[1] = {counter};
    q.push(a);
    counter++;
}

while (!q.empty()) {
    int *top = q.front();
    q.pop();

    cout << top[0] << endl;
}

It should print out: 1 2 3, but instead 3 3 3 is printed out. This is because the pointers in the queue are all the same after each run through the loop. Why does that happen?

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4  
From what source are you learning C++ that you would even conceive of doing such a thing? –  Benjamin Lindley May 24 '11 at 22:43
2  
@Benjamin The internet –  Jeff Chen May 24 '11 at 22:46
2  
    
As Abraham Lincoln once said, you can't believe everything you read on the Internet! –  Johnsyweb May 24 '11 at 22:53
    
This is my favorite thing today. –  Greg May 24 '11 at 23:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You are storing pointers to local variables and using those pointers after the local variables they point to have gone out of scope.

In other words: you are invoking Undefined Behavior.

Result: It should not print out "1 2 3". It doesn't have to do anything and is allowed to do whatever it likes. "3 3 3" seems reasonable to me, as it is also allowed to crash.

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int a[1] = {counter};
q.push(a);

Not correct. It invokes undefined behvaiour, as a doesn't exist outside the curly braces (the for-loop block). Even if it were well-defined, your code has another problem, all the items in queue is same, as a (the same memory) gets used repeatedly in the loop.

The solution is this:

int *a = new int[1];
a[0] = counter;
q.push(a);

If you do so, then you've to deallocate the memory yourself, of course.


But I'm wondering if every item in queue is just one int,then why not use the following:

queue<int> q;

for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) 
{
  q.push(counter);
  counter++;
}

Or if you really want array, then why not use std::queue<std::vector<int> > as :

std::queue<std::vector<int> > q;

for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) 
{
  std::vector<int> v;
  v.push_back(counter);
  q.push(v); //dont worry - a copy of the vector is being pushed!
  counter++;
}

In this way, you don't have to deal with raw pointers. You don't have to allocate or deallocate memory yourself which in my opinion is a safe approach!

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so if i do it this way and variable a goes out of scope (say i pass q to some other function), does q.pop() free up the heap memory originally pointed to by a? –  Jeff Chen May 24 '11 at 22:49
    
@Jeff: No. You've to deallocate it yourself. –  Nawaz May 24 '11 at 22:54
    
I used int* in the example to generalize to arrays instead of just ints –  Jeff Chen May 24 '11 at 22:54
    
@Jeff Chen No, you have to make q a queue<auto_ptr<int>> (assuming you're using new int(counter)) to achieve that. –  Neil May 24 '11 at 22:56
1  
@Nawaz: the vector approach makes a lot of sense...I'm still getting comfortable with thinking in C++ instead of falling back to C –  Jeff Chen May 24 '11 at 23:05

You have undefined behavior, since your declaration of a goes out of scope at the end of the loop where you're pushing it into the queue.

What's probably happening is that the memory location of a gets reused each time through, but there are absolutely no guarantees. You might get a different output next time you run it, or you might get a crash, or demons may fly out of your nostrils.

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If you insist on using pointers to integers, the following code does what you want:

#include <queue>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
  std::queue<int*> q;

  int counter = 1;
  for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    int* a = new int;
    *a = counter;
    q.push(a);
    counter++;
  }

  while (!q.empty()) {
    int *top = q.front();
    q.pop();

    std::cout << *top << std::endl;
    delete top;
  }

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
q.push(new int(counter)); also works, I think. –  Neil May 24 '11 at 22:57
2  
@Neil it does, but I didn't want to change OP's code any more than necessary so that the issue would be more clear. –  Chris Morgan May 24 '11 at 22:59
    
Clear and down to the point. +1. –  Jas May 25 '11 at 7:08

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