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When I do the following:

class C:
 pass

def f( self ):
 print self

a = C()

a.f = f

a.f()

I get the following error at the line a.f(): TypeError: f() takes exactly 1 argument (0 given)

The problem appears to be that when f is added to the instance, a, it is treated like a function that is stored inside of a, rather than an actual member function. If I change a.f() to a.f(a), then I get the intended effect, but is there a way to make python interpret the original example this way? In other words, is there a way to add a member function to an instance of a class at runtime?

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted
import types
class C:
    pass

def f(self):
    print self

a = C()
a.f = types.MethodType(f,a)
a.f()
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2  
This is the way to add the function to the specific instance a (other instances of class C won't have f). –  Dave Jul 13 '12 at 15:33
    
C.f = types.MethodType(f,None,C) would be the code to add the function to any existing or eventual new instances of the class C –  Julius Mar 31 at 1:24

You should put f in the class, not in the instance...

 class C:
     pass

 def f(self):
    print(self)

 a = C()
 C.f = f
 a.f()

For the interpreter myObject.foo() is the same as myClass.foo(myObject) when the object doesn't hold anything named foo, but a function placed inside a object is just a function.

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This doesnt work –  balki Jun 11 '12 at 19:04
2  
This is the way to add the function to all instances of class C (and it's sub-classes). –  Dave Jul 13 '12 at 15:34

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