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(Firstly, as a disclaimer, this is related to an assignment. I'm not asking anyone to do my assignment for me, just to try and help me understand how to implement templates properly.)

My current setup is:

I have class A, which is a base class. Class B, C and D all children of Class A.

I'm trying to make a linked list that, within a single list, can point to either B, C or D.

What I currently have setup is something like this:

enum Types { TypeB, TypeC, TypeD }

struct Node
{
    void * pointerToElement;
    int type;
    Node * next;
};

struct Header
{
    int counter;
    Node * first;
};

This actually works. When I go through the linked list to print out all the elements, I use the and if statement and the int type to identify what kind it is (based on the ENUM defined), and then use static_cast to cast the void pointer to a pointer of either class B, C or D.

Now, I've been told I'm required to use templates instead, which is causing a whole lot of headache. I haven't done much with templates, but my experience with them hasn't been all that pleasant.

My understanding of templates is that I could use it to define the whole linked list with EITHER class B, C or D, but it wouldn't be plausible to have B, C or D all appearing in the same linked list?

I have tried the following:

enum Types { TypeB, TypeC, TypeD } // I realise that if templates work, I won't need this

template <class T>
struct Node
{
    T * pointerToElement;
    int type;
    Node<T> * next;    // Reason 1 I suspect I could only use one type
};

template <class T>
struct Header
{
    int counter;
    Node<T> * first;    // Reason 2 I suspect I could only use one type
};

The main question I have, are templates supposed to be able to do this? When implementing it in a class, I needed to specify a type for the header, which I didn't want to do, so I made that class a template as well, and it kept following through to the rest of my code which shouldn't need to be a template, and finally got to main() where I would have had to define either class B, C or D.

Comments and suggestions appreciated.

Thanks.

Edit

Thanks everyone for the comments, I've probably learnt more trying this then from the lectures.

What I've done is pretty much ditched templates, or at least the way I was trying to use them. I have used templates (unfortunately for the sake of using templates,) and it works. Here's what I've now done (all worked out from all of the helpful comments... thanks!)

template <class T>
struct Node
{
    T * pointerToElement;
    int type;   // I can get rid of this after I go through the code and remove all references to it, which I am doing now.
    Node<T> * next;    // Reason 1 I suspect I could only use one type
};

template <class T>
struct Header
{
    int counter;
    Node<T> * first;    // Reason 2 I suspect I could only use one type
};

is still the way it was, but when declaring the Header, I declare it as:

Header * myHeader;

(I'm using a class structure identical to the one in the solution below).

So this is pointing to the base class, the one that all the other classes are derived from. Then, because of inheritance, I can store class B, C or D in there without any problems, and providing that all the functions defined in the derived classes (B, C and D) are defined in the base class, I can call it directly without having to cast it (for example, they all have their own print function, and it calls the correct one when it is defined in the derived class).

I think the idea that the Assignment is trying to get across is a linked list that can be used with any type, I think there was some miscommunication (probably mostly due to me,) were I thought templates were supposed to be used to define different class types in each node, rather they can be used to define the base class.

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1  
This sounds like a job for inheritance –  GWW May 25 '11 at 1:53
    
A little discombobulated, but +1 for a good homework question. –  John Dibling May 25 '11 at 1:55
    
GWW: Class B, C and D are all inherited from class A. In the actual assignment, it's simulating a bank, so class A is Account, and B, C and D are Savings, Cheque or Credit accounts. The idea is that every customer has a linked list of accounts, and their account could be of any time, and apparently I'm required to use templates to satisfy the marking criteria (where as I use void*). I'm thinking I may end up throwing in templates somewhere else in the assignment. John: Thanks. –  joshhendo May 25 '11 at 2:01
    
@joshendo: Are you sure that you are required to use templates for this part of the assignment? What was the actual wording of the question? –  GWW May 25 '11 at 2:09
    
The coordinator of the subject isn't the best at writing assignments, and the templates thing is only word of mouth from last week from another academic (which is why it's apparently, rather than for sure... half the work for the assignment is working out what to do.). I think I'll use derived classes/inheritance and ditch the template thing completely, it doesn't seem to be possible or a good idea, and is breaking my otherwise working program. Thanks for the comments. –  joshhendo May 25 '11 at 2:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Instead of templates you should be using inheritance. Templates, as you guessed, create instance per type T, and that is not what you want.

Your code should be something in these lines:

class A{...};
class B: public A{...};
class C: public A{...};
class D: public A{...};
struct Node{
    A *next;
}

you can assign to next pointers to either A, B, C, or D. Make sure to mark member functions as virtual where appropriate.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm thinking that's what I might end up doing. Just a quick question, if class B has a function that class C doesn't have, is it fine to define it in class A as a virtual function even if it doesn't appear in all the derived functions? –  joshhendo May 25 '11 at 2:20
1  
@joshhendo - if it is a pure virtual function (i.e.: in class A you don't have a body for this function, just a declaration with =0 after it), then all the derived classes must implement it. If A has implementation for it, then C will inherit that implementation unless it has one of its own. In any case, when iterating through the list you will only be able to access member functions and variables that are defined for A, unless you cast to something else (using dynamic_cast rather than static_cast, read about the differences and uses). –  littleadv May 25 '11 at 2:25
1  
@joshhendo: Take a look at the SOLID principles, and in particular the Liskov substitution principle. In well-designed program, if you write an operation that uses some object of type A, you should be able to substitute an object of type B, C, or D in its place, and the program should still be correct. (In short, it isn't fine to do what you say, though C++ allows you to do it.) –  Karmastan May 25 '11 at 2:30

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