Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have problem writing a testcase to this method below: EvenNum(double)

public class OddEven {

/**
 * @param args
 */

public boolean evenNum(double num)
{
    if(num%2 == 0)
    {
        System.out.print(true);
        return true;
    }
    else
    {
        System.out.print(false);
        return false;
    }

}

This is the testcase I wrote but I think I have an inheritance problem or a logical problem in this test case. Should be a very simple one but can't figure out. Here is the code I wrote:

import static org.junit.Assert.*;
import org.junit.Test;

public class OddEvenTest {
    @Test
    public void testEvenNum() {
        boolean ans = true;
        boolean val;
        double num= 6;

        val = OddEven.EvenNum(num) // cant inherit the method dont know why???

        assertEquals(ans,val);
    }

}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Two things :

  • You are invoking a non-static method statically. The method should be declared static:

    public static boolean evenNum(double num) {
    . . . }

  • You didn't type the name of the method correctly. Look closely. Also consider renaming it something more readable like, isEven(...)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks got it now. –  Splitter May 25 '11 at 4:18

You have a number of issues:

  • you are attempting to call a non-static method statically
  • method names in java are case sensitive and you've mixed up the case.

I corrected some things for you and just verified the code below:

OddEven.java:

public class OddEven {

        public boolean evenNum(double num)
        {
            if(num%2 == 0)
            {
                System.out.print(true);
                return true;
            }
            else
            {
                System.out.print(false);
                return false;
            }

        }
}

OddEvenTest.java

import static org.junit.Assert.*;
import org.junit.Test;

public class OddEvenTest {

    @Test
    public void testEvenNum() {
        boolean ans = true;
        boolean val;
        double num = 6;
        OddEven oddEven = new OddEven();

        val = oddEven.evenNum(num);
        assertEquals(ans,val);
    }

}

Assuming the calls to System.out.println() in OddEven are strictly for debugging, the whole thing could be collapsed down to:

OddEven.java

public class OddEven {
    public boolean evenNum(double num) {
        return num%2 == 0;
    }
}

OddEvenTest.java

import static org.junit.Assert.*;
import org.junit.Test;

public class OddEvenTest {

    @Test
    public void testEvenNum() {
        OddEven oddEven = new OddEven();
        assertTrue(oddEven.evenNum(6));
        assertFalse(oddEven.evenNum(5));
    }
}

The code is now shorter and the unit test even covers an odd case for good measure.

share|improve this answer
    
A method like isEven really should be static. I mean, what is an OddEven object anyway...? I won't downvote since you have close to 4x my rep and must know something I don't. –  Amir Afghani May 25 '11 at 4:12
    
@Amir Afghani: the oddEven() method certainly could be static here and making it so might be a sensible thing to do. But ideally, we would like to get a passing unit test in place before refactoring. So I wrote the unit test against the OddEven class as presented. Once there is a passing unit test, we can refactor. Additionally, there exists a school of thought among unit testing zealots that says that all things static are evil. Google the subject and you can find out more. Also, don't let anyone's rep fool you. Anyone can be wrong about something no matter what their rep is. :) –  Asaph May 25 '11 at 4:25

This seems like testing gone mad to me, and programming gone mad too. All the method does is evaluate num % 2 == 0. You may as well just code that everywhere required and throw away both the method and its tests. If you must keep the method, it relies on a mathematical identity, you don't need to test those. You may as well test 1+1==2.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.