Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In C++, I can initialize a vector<wstring> with a wchar_t** like in this example:

#include <windows.h>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <cwchar>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    int argc;
    wchar_t** const args = CommandLineToArgvW(GetCommandLineW(), &argc);
    if (args) {
        const vector<wstring> argv(args, args + argc);
        LocalFree(args);
    }
}

However, is there a way to initialize a wstring[] with a wchar** in D 2.0?

I can add the contents of the wchar** to the wstring[] this way:

import std.c.windows.windows;
import std.c.wcharh;

extern(Windows) {
    wchar* GetCommandLineW();
    wchar** CommandLineToArgvW(wchar*, int*);
    void* LocalFree(void*);
}

void main() {
    int argc;
    wchar** args = CommandLineToArgvW(GetCommandLineW(), &argc);
    if (args) {
        wstring[] argv;
        for (size_t i = 0; i < argc; ++i) {
            wstring temp;
            const size_t len = wcslen(args[i]);
            for (size_t z = 0; z < len; ++z) {
                temp ~= args[i][z];
            }
            argv ~= temp;
        }
        LocalFree(args);
    }
}

But, I'd like to find a cleaner, simpler way like the C++ version. (Performance is not an concern)

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Here is a simpler version using slices:

import std.c.windows.windows;
import std.c.wcharh;
import std.conv;

extern(Windows) {
    wchar* GetCommandLineW();
    wchar** CommandLineToArgvW(wchar*, int*);
    void* LocalFree(void*);
}

void main() {
    int argc;
    wchar** args = CommandLineToArgvW(GetCommandLineW(), &argc);
    if (args) {
        wstring[] argv = new wstring[argc];
        foreach (i, ref arg; argv)
            arg = to!wstring(args[i][0 .. wcslen(args[i])]);
        LocalFree(args);
    }
}

Another option would be to use void main(string[] args) and convert to args wstring if you really need.

share|improve this answer
    
Will the strings in string[] args be encoded as UTF-8? I'm using CommandLineToArgvW to get wide command line arguments (which could contain all kinds of unicode chars) and then using std.utf.toUTF8() to convert each argument to a string encoded as UTF-8. If string[] args satisfies that, then I'll just use that instead. But, I didnt think it did. –  Shadow2531 May 25 '11 at 11:44
    
With that said, if I modify your example and change argv to be a string[] and use std.utf.toUTF8() instead of to!wstring(), I think it produces the result I desire. But, if main(string[] args) really does produce the same utf-8 encoding, I'll definitely use that. –  Shadow2531 May 25 '11 at 11:57
    
There is one issue with wcslen() that I didn't mention. If I import std.string, dmd says that std.string.wcslen conflicts with core.stdc.wchar_.wcslen. So, if there's a nice way to do it without wcslen(), that'd be great too. –  Shadow2531 May 25 '11 at 12:00
3  
In D string types map to UTF encodings. string = UTF-8, wstring = UTF-16, dstring = UTF-32. D runtime must provide args as properly encoded utf-8 strings, so if you convert command arguments to utf-8, you should just use void main(string[] args) for that. –  Nekuromento May 25 '11 at 13:22
1  
About name conflicts, D is pedantic about possible identifier hijacking, so if there is a conflict, it can be solved by using full identifier, e.g. int foo = core.stdc.wchar_.wcslen(yourString);. Another way to solve this would be renaming functions on import, e.g. import std.string : wideStringLength = wcslen;. This statement will import just one function wcslen from std.string module and rename it to wideStringLength. This will resolve name conflict. wsclen will call core.stdc.wchar_.wcslen and wideStringLength will call std.string.wcslen. –  Nekuromento May 25 '11 at 13:30

you can use

void main(wstring[] args){
//...
}

to get the commandline arguments much easier

edit: and the only reason you'd get a char pointer in D is if you are using C functions directly while 90% of the time you shouldn't need to (or should abstract it away)

share|improve this answer
    
wstring[] isn't supported for the main argument. –  Shadow2531 May 25 '11 at 11:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.