Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have some code that demonstrates the use of threads by the use of the Runnable interface. I started with code off a website somewhere, and modified it to my liking. It works, but I don't understand part of it. I tried to strip the code down to the essence of what I am asking, but I may have taken too much out. The code I have in NetBeans works, so this is working code, unless I messed it up by taking the wrong thing out. But let me ask my question, and see if it can be answered regardless: The part I don't understand is this part:

public String toString()
       {
return "Thread " + Thread.currentThread().getName() + ": " + countDown;
       }

For the longest time, this just looked to me like a member variable whose name is dynamically set at runtime equal to the name of the current thread. But I have also read in more than one place that you cannot dynamically name variables in Java, so I guess that isn't what I'm looking at. Then, I realized that NetBeans wanted me to put @Override right before this code section, because something is being overridden. But I don't understand exactly what is being overridden. Am I overriding the constructor of some parent class? If so, what class?

Anyway, here is the code:

package countdown;

public class Counter implements Runnable
{
private int countDown = 5;
public String toString()
       {
return "Thread " + Thread.currentThread().getName() + ": " + countDown;
       }


public void run()
    {
   while(true) {
  System.out.println(this);
  if(--countDown == 0)
                      {
return;
                      }
                }
    }
}
package countdown;

public class Main 
{

public static void main(String[] args)
    {
for(int i = 1; i <= 5; i++)
  new Thread(new Counter(), "" + i).start();
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
For clarity, as it is pertinent to this question: In Java, ALL classes will implicitly inherit from java.lang.Object. This is part of the language specification. So, as a lot of people have already mentioned, your IDE suggests @Override on toString() since it's one of the methods defined in the Object class. For more information on toString(), read the javadoc for java.lang.Object, download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/…. –  pap May 25 '11 at 6:35

2 Answers 2

Every class implements toString( ) because it is defined by Object. However, the default implementation of toString( ) is seldom sufficient.

For most important classes that you create, you will want to override toString( ) and provide your own string representations. Fortunately, this is easy to do. The toString( ) method has this general form:

String toString( )   

The toString() method of an object gets invoked automatically, when an object reference is passed in the System.out.println() method.


@Override serves as documentation for the reader and a double check in the compiler. Use the @Override annotation to indicate that a method is overriding another in the base class.

For e.g

@Override
public String toString()
       {
return "Thread " + Thread.currentThread().getName() + ": " + countDown;
       }

See : When do you use Java's @Override annotation and why?

share|improve this answer

Okay, what's up there is that you are overriding the Object.toString() method, which always returns some string representation of the named class. All it's doing is composing a string like

"Thread XXX: 5"

In Java, you can always override a parent classes (non-final) methods; the @Override tag is just helpful hinting for tools. But it's not setting the name of anything: it creates a new, anonymous string, and returns its reference.

If you called standard toString() on Thread, you'd get a string like "<#Thread 2348564>" or something equally useful; now, for this class, you get useful information.

share|improve this answer
    
I know I'm nitpicking, but you can't override 'final' parent class methods. –  Bringer128 May 25 '11 at 6:15
    
That is true, but if otherwise not indicated every method is declared virtual. "final" is an exception for this. –  Adam Arold May 25 '11 at 6:17
    
Yeah; being an OO purist I see that as broken and always forget. –  Charlie Martin May 25 '11 at 14:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.