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I am wrapping (many) c++ classes with boost::python. If I mistype the attribute name when assigning it from a python script, python silently creates new instance attribute, which is never what I indent. Is there a way to catch such events (and raise exception?)?

I've seen a few posts on the web on the topic, but none of them seemd to give a definitive answer; I was trying to override __setattr__ & friends, but I was not able to get it right; plus I was concerned about possible performance impact.

Cheers, Vaclav

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1 Answer 1

__setattr__ is in fact the way to go. If you're worried about performance, I think python still does this call internally anyway, so overriding the function should not cost any more. The problem with __setattr__ is that if you're trying to keep your implementation inside your c++ code, it can be tricky to implement.

Here's a python version:

# MyClassBase defined in C++ library
class MyClass(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.test1 = 'test1'
        self.__initialized = True
    def __setattr__(self, name, value):
        if not self.__dict__.has_key('_MyClass__initialized') or self.__dict__.has_key(name):
            object.__setattr__(self, name, value)
        else:
            raise AttributeError("Attribute %s does not exist." % name)

def main():
    o = MyClass()
    print o.test1
    o.test1 = 'test1_set'
    print o.test1
    # This will throw
    o.test2 = 'test2_set'

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

Here's a way to do it using metaclasses. The advantage of this method is that you only have to define the __setattr__ function once, then you can just define each class using your injector class:

# create an injector metaclass to add functionality to
# our modules, you can reuse BoostPythonMetaclass for
# all boost::python-exported objects
BoostPythonMetaclass = MyClass.__class__
class injector(object):
    class __metaclass__(BoostPythonMetaclass):
        def __init__(self, name, bases, dict):
            for b in bases:
                if type(b) not in (self, type):
                    for k,v in dict.items():
                        setattr(b,k,v)
                    setattr(b, '__initialized', True)
            return type.__init__(self, name, bases, dict)

        def __setattr__(self, name, value):
            if not self.__dict__.has_key('_MyClass__initialized') or self.__dict__.has_key(name):
                object.__setattr__(self, name, value)
            else:
                raise AttributeError("Attribute %s does not exist." % name)

# Use the injector to add our functionality
class MyClass(injector, MyClass):
    pass

If you want to do the same in c++, it's a bit trickier:

using namespace boost::python;

static void SetAttr(object self, str name, object value)
{
    dict d = getattr(self, "__dict__");
    if(d.has_key(name)) {
        setattr(self, name, value);
    } else {
        std::stringstream ss;
        ss << "Method" << extract<std::string>(name) << "does not exist.";
        PyErr_SetString(PyExc_AttributeError, ss.str().c_str());
        throw error_already_set();
    }
}

BOOST_PYTHON_MODULE(mymodule)
{
    class_<MyClass>("MyClass")
        .def("__setattr__", &SetAttr);
}
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Thanks! It sort-of works. I was afraid that py::setattr(...) will recursively call __setattr__ in infinite recursion. The problem is, however, that none of the attributes is in __dict__, even though they exist. E.g. s=Sphere(), s.radius gives nan (the default value), but s.radius=3.1 errors out. Looking in s.__dict__, I get {} (!!), although dir(s) returns all what I expect. Consequently then, the if(d.has_key(name)) is never true, and I cannot assign to any attribute... What's wrong? –  eudoxos May 29 '11 at 13:29
    
When I remove the dict check: calling setattr(...) from python results in loop and raises the "maximum recursion limit exceeded" exception :-| –  eudoxos May 30 '11 at 19:16
    
Ok, I've figured out what's wrong. __setattr__ will be called even from the constructor. This means that you'll need to differentiate between the "valid" attributes and the "invalid" ones. That's simple enough to do by setting a flag at the end of your constructor. Note that to access private attributes through __dict__ you have to use _ClassName__attribute notation, where ClassName is your class name and __attribute is your attribute name. –  Aleksey Vitebskiy May 31 '11 at 13:14

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