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These days I'm working on simulating modal dialog in Android. I've googled a lot, there's much discussions but sadly there's not much options to get it modal. Here's some background,
Dialogs, Modal Dialogs and Blockin
Dialogs / AlertDialogs: How to "block execution" while dialog is up (.NET-style)

There's no straight way to get modal behavior, then I came up with 3 possible solutions,
1. Use a dialog-themed activity, like this thread said, but I still can't make main activity truly wait for dialog-activity return. Main activity turned to stop status and got restarted then.
2. Build one worker thread, and use thread synchronization. However, it's a huge refactoring job for my app, now I have a single main activity and a service both in main UI thread.
3. Take over event handling within a loop when there is a modal dialog up, and quit loop when dialog gets closed. Actually it's the way to build a real modal dialog like what it exactly does in Windows. I still haven't prototyped this way.

I'd still like to simulate it with a dialog-themed activity,
1. start dialog-activity by startActivityForResult()
2. get result from onActivityResult()
Here's some source

public class MainActivity extends Activity {

@Override
public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

    MyView v = new MyView(this);
    setContentView(v);
}

private final int RESULT_CODE_ALERT = 1;
private boolean mAlertResult = false;
public boolean startAlertDialog() {
    Intent it = new Intent(this, DialogActivity.class);
    it.putExtra("AlertInfo", "This is an alert");
    startActivityForResult(it, RESULT_CODE_ALERT);

    // I want to wait right here
    return mAlertResult;
}

@Override
protected void onActivityResult (int requestCode, int resultCode, Intent data) {
    switch (requestCode) {
    case RESULT_CODE_ALERT:
        Bundle ret = data.getExtras();
        mAlertResult = ret.getBoolean("AlertResult");
        break;
    }
}
}

The caller of startAlertDialog will block execution and expect returned result. But startAlertDialog returned immediately of course, and main activity went into STOP status while DialogActivity was up.

So the question is, how to make main activity really wait for result?
Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
This post may help you. stackoverflow.com/questions/2028697/… –  Daniel Apr 27 '13 at 6:50
    
I can't really believe Android sucks on this very simple things. –  Mel Enada Apr 29 at 16:33

8 Answers 8

I got a modal Dialog while using:

setCancelable(false);

on the DialogFragment (not on the DialogBuilder).

share|improve this answer
2  
Works like a charm. Example: final AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(this).setCancelable(false); –  slott Jun 3 '14 at 15:07

It is not possible the way you planned. First, you are not allowed to block the UI thread. Your application will be terminated. Second, need to handle the lifecycle methods that are called when another activity is started with startActivity (your original acitvity will be paused while the other activity is running). Third, you probably could somehow hack it by using startAlertDialog() not from the UI thread, with thread synchronization (like Object.wait()) and some AlertDialog. However, I strongly encourage you to not do this. It is ugly, will certainly break and it's just not the way things are intended to work.

Redesign your approach to capture the asynchronous nature of these events. If you want for example some dialog which asks the user for a decsision (like accepting the ToS or not) and do special actions based on that decision create a dialog like this:

AlertDialog dialog = new AlertDialog.Builder(context).setMessage(R.string.someText)
                .setPositiveButton(android.R.string.ok, new OnClickListener() {

                    @Override
                    public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                        dialog.dismiss();
                        // Do stuff if user accepts
                    }
                }).setNegativeButton(android.R.string.cancel, new OnClickListener() {

                    @Override
                    public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                        dialog.dismiss();
                        // Do stuff when user neglects.
                    }
                }).setOnCancelListener(new OnCancelListener() {

                    @Override
                    public void onCancel(DialogInterface dialog) {
                        dialog.dismiss();
                        // Do stuff when cancelled
                    }
                }).create();
dialog.show();

Then have two methods handling positive or negative feedback accordingly (i.e. proceeding with some operation or finishing the activity or whatever makes sense).

share|improve this answer
1  
thanks. I completely agreed everything you presented above. Unfortunately, it's a MUST requirement for me, and the real situation is much more complicated, a long story. Modal behavior is basically conflict against design of Android, we all know, but... Anyway, I'm trying looking for somewhat elegant way to solve it :( is Solution 3 an option? –  fifth May 25 '11 at 9:59
    
Is it possible to have rich controls (like buttons, textviews and editviews) in such a dialog? which can wait until user provides something as input, and focuses back to activity which was running. –  Kush Jun 12 '12 at 15:34
2  
I take issue with the way this was worded "It is not possible the way you planned. First, you are not allowed to block the UI thread." -- one need not block the UI thread to display a Modal dialog -- Windows will kill your apps if they block the UI thread as well, but it doesn't stop them from having modal dialogs -- those apps continue to handle messages and be responsive while forcing the user to deal with the modal dialog before returning to the parent window (and no, the parent windows aren't blocking either -- they handle all of their events normally). –  BrainSlugs83 Aug 3 '13 at 1:20
    
@BrainSlugs83: "Windows will kill your apps if they block the UI thread as well.." - No it wont. –  legomaker Apr 17 at 7:11

Developers of Android and iOS decided that they are powerful and smart enough to reject Modal Dialog conception (that was on market for many-many years already and didn't bother anyone before), unfortunately for us.

Here is my solution, it works great:

    int pressedButtonID;
    private final Semaphore dialogSemaphore = new Semaphore(0, true);
    final Runnable mMyDialog = new Runnable()
    {
        public void run()
        {
            AlertDialog errorDialog = new AlertDialog.Builder( [your activity object here] ).create();
            errorDialog.setMessage("My dialog!");
            errorDialog.setButton("My Button1", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
                @Override
                public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                    pressedButtonID = MY_BUTTON_ID1;
                    dialogSemaphore.release();
                    }
                });
            errorDialog.setButton2("My Button2", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
                @Override
                public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                    pressedButtonID = MY_BUTTON_ID2;
                    dialogSemaphore.release();
                    }
                });
            errorDialog.setCancelable(false);
            errorDialog.show();
        }
    };

    public int ShowMyModalDialog()  //should be called from non-UI thread
    {
        pressedButtonID = MY_BUTTON_INVALID_ID;
        runOnUiThread(mMyDialog);
        try
        {
            dialogSemaphore.acquire();
        }
        catch (InterruptedException e)
        {
        }
        return pressedButtonID;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this did the trick for me. As for a use case: I need a modal dialog that blocks input because it's used for an assert triggered by C++. The dialog must block the UI thread because the thread might trigger more asserts. –  knight666 Jul 28 '14 at 13:01

Finally I ended up with a really straight and simple solution.

People who's familiar with Win32 programming possibly knows how to implement a modal dialog. Generally it runs a nested message loop (by GetMessage/PostMessage) when there is a modal dialog up. So, I tried to implement my own modal dialog in this traditional way.

At the first, android didn't provide interfaces to inject into ui thread message loop, or I didn't find one. When I looked into source, Looper.loop(), I found it's exactly what I wanted. But still, MessageQueue/Message haven't provided public interfaces. Fortunately, we have reflection in java. Basically, I just copied exactly what Looper.loop() did, it blocked workflow and still properly handled events. I haven't tested nested modal dialog, but theoretically it would work.

Here's my source code,

public class ModalDialog {

private boolean mChoice = false;        
private boolean mQuitModal = false;     

private Method mMsgQueueNextMethod = null;
private Field mMsgTargetFiled = null;

public ModalDialog() {
}

public void showAlertDialog(Context context, String info) {
    if (!prepareModal()) {
        return;
    }

    // build alert dialog
    AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(context);
    builder.setMessage(info);
    builder.setCancelable(false);
    builder.setPositiveButton("Yes", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
        public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int id) {
            ModalDialog.this.mQuitModal = true;
            dialog.dismiss();
        }
    });

    AlertDialog alert = builder.create();
    alert.show();

    // run in modal mode
    doModal();
}

public boolean showConfirmDialog(Context context, String info) {
    if (!prepareModal()) {
        return false;
    }

    // reset choice
    mChoice = false;

    AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(context);
    builder.setMessage(info);
    builder.setCancelable(false);
    builder.setPositiveButton("Yes", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
        public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int id) {
            ModalDialog.this.mQuitModal = true;
            ModalDialog.this.mChoice = true;
            dialog.dismiss();
        }
    });

    builder.setNegativeButton("Cancel", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
        public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int id) {
            ModalDialog.this.mQuitModal = true;
            ModalDialog.this.mChoice = false;
            dialog.cancel();
        }
    });

    AlertDialog alert = builder.create();
    alert.show();

    doModal();
    return mChoice;
}

private boolean prepareModal() {
    Class<?> clsMsgQueue = null;
    Class<?> clsMessage = null;

    try {
        clsMsgQueue = Class.forName("android.os.MessageQueue");
    } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        return false;
    }

    try {
        clsMessage = Class.forName("android.os.Message");
    } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        return false;
    }

    try {
        mMsgQueueNextMethod = clsMsgQueue.getDeclaredMethod("next", new Class[]{});
    } catch (SecurityException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        return false;
    } catch (NoSuchMethodException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        return false;
    }

    mMsgQueueNextMethod.setAccessible(true);

    try {
        mMsgTargetFiled = clsMessage.getDeclaredField("target");
    } catch (SecurityException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        return false;
    } catch (NoSuchFieldException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        return false;
    }

    mMsgTargetFiled.setAccessible(true);
    return true;
}

private void doModal() {
    mQuitModal = false;

    // get message queue associated with main UI thread
    MessageQueue queue = Looper.myQueue();
    while (!mQuitModal) {
        // call queue.next(), might block
        Message msg = null;
        try {
            msg = (Message)mMsgQueueNextMethod.invoke(queue, new Object[]{});
        } catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (InvocationTargetException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

        if (null != msg) {
            Handler target = null;
            try {
                target = (Handler)mMsgTargetFiled.get(msg);
            } catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }

            if (target == null) {
                // No target is a magic identifier for the quit message.
                mQuitModal = true;
            }

            target.dispatchMessage(msg);
            msg.recycle();
        }
    }
}
}

Hopefully this would help.

share|improve this answer
15  
DO NOT DO THIS. This code is using private APIs. It is OBVIOUSLY using private APIs. Anybody doing this can expect their app to break. –  hackbod Jun 2 '11 at 4:34
1  
This code is embarrassing. Nobody in their right mind should be using these sorts of techniques. –  CommonsWare Jun 2 '11 at 17:18
7  
this just shows you that android framework is poorly designed in the first place. How can you not have a simple mechanism for modal dialogs???! –  Saideira Sep 21 '11 at 19:34
1  
The main trouble with using another Activity as a dialog is that you can't distinguish between losing focus for the whole application and losing focus because another activity in your application is on top on onPause(). In that case, using a modal-like dialog may make sense. Especially if the client requirements have changed but you're not "enterprise" and don't have the budget for 3 months of refactoring... –  Torp Jun 30 '13 at 6:54
1  
Even though this is bad programming, I upvoted just for the proof of concept. –  pellucide Sep 19 '13 at 18:20

This works for me: create an Activity as your dialog. Then,

  1. Add this to your manifest for the activity:

    android:theme="@android:style/Theme.Dialog"

  2. Add this to onCreate of your activity

    setFinishOnTouchOutside (false);

  3. Override onBackPressed in your activity:

    @Override public void onBackPressed() { // prevent "back" from leaving this activity }

The first gives the activity the dialog look. The latter two make it behave like a modal dialog.

share|improve this answer
    
Thx for that. Exactly what i was looking for. –  Andre Aus B Aug 25 '14 at 20:00

It's not difficult.

Assume you have a flag on your owner activity (named waiting_for_result), whenever your activity is resumed:

public void onResume(){
    if (waiting_for_result) {
        // Start the dialog Activity
    }
}

This guaranteed the owner activity, unless the modal dialog is dismissed, whenever it try to get focus will pass to the modal dialog activity.

share|improve this answer
1  
I've updated first thread with some source. I didn't follow you here, is there something to do with onResume? thx. –  fifth May 25 '11 at 7:20

One solution is :

  1. Put all code for each selected button into the listener of each button.
  2. alert.show(); must be the last code line in the function calling the Alert. Any code after this line will not wait to close the Alert, but will execute immediately.

Hope Help!

share|improve this answer
    
This worked for me. I was able to simulate modality by calling dialog.setOnDissmissListener. –  BrainSlugs83 Aug 3 '13 at 1:35

As hackbod and others have pointed out, Android deliberately doesn't provide a method for doing nested event loops. I understand the reasons for this, but there are certain situations that require them. In our case we have our own virtual machine running on various platforms and we wanted to port it to Android. Internally there a lot of places where it requires a nested event loop, and it isn't really feasible to rewrite the whole thing just for Android. Anyway, here is a solution (basically taken from How can I do non-blocking events processing on Android?, but I have added a timeout):

private class IdleHandler implements MessageQueue.IdleHandler
{
    private Looper _looper;
    private int _timeout;
    protected IdleHandler(Looper looper, int timeout)
    {
        _looper = looper;
        _timeout = timeout;
    }

    public boolean queueIdle()
    {
        _uiEventsHandler = new Handler(_looper);
        if (_timeout > 0)
        {
            _uiEventsHandler.postDelayed(_uiEventsTask, _timeout);
        }
        else
        {
            _uiEventsHandler.post(_uiEventsTask);
        }
        return(false);
    }
};

private boolean _processingEventsf = false;
private Handler _uiEventsHandler = null;

private Runnable _uiEventsTask = new Runnable()
{
    public void run() {
    Looper looper = Looper.myLooper();
    looper.quit();
    _uiEventsHandler.removeCallbacks(this);
    _uiEventsHandler = null;
    }
};

public void processEvents(int timeout)
{
    if (!_processingEventsf)
    {
        Looper looper = Looper.myLooper();
        looper.myQueue().addIdleHandler(new IdleHandler(looper, timeout));
        _processingEventsf = true;
        try
        {
            looper.loop();
        } catch (RuntimeException re)
        {
            // We get an exception when we try to quit the loop.
        }
        _processingEventsf = false;
     }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain what you mean by nested event loop? –  Imray Sep 29 '14 at 13:24
1  
It means you have two event loop calls on your callstack. Android provides it's own event loop (the main Looper, which is created automatically). If you want to have a modal dialog or similar, you need to create your own event loop, so you will end up with two nested event loops on the callstack. –  CpnCrunch Sep 30 '14 at 14:29

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