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Problem

Let us suppose that we have a list xs (possibly a very big one), and we want to check that all its elements are the same.

I came up with various ideas:

Solution 0

checking that all elements in tail xs are equal to head xs:

allTheSame :: (Eq a) => [a] -> Bool
allTheSame xs = and $ map (== head xs) (tail xs)

Solution 1

checking that length xs is equal to the length of the list obtained by taking elements from xs while they're equal to head xs

allTheSame' :: (Eq a) => [a] -> Bool
allTheSame' xs = (length xs) == (length $ takeWhile (== head xs) xs)

Solution 2

recursive solution: allTheSame returns True if the first two elements of xs are equal and allTheSame returns True on the rest of xs

allTheSame'' :: (Eq a) => [a] -> Bool
allTheSame'' xs
  | n == 0 = False
  | n == 1 = True
  | n == 2 = xs !! 0 == xs !! 1
  | otherwise = (xs !! 0 == xs !! 1) && (allTheSame'' $ snd $ splitAt 2 xs)
    where  n = length xs

Solution 3

divide and conquer:

allTheSame''' :: (Eq a) => [a] -> Bool
allTheSame''' xs
  | n == 0 = False
  | n == 1 = True
  | n == 2 = xs !! 0 == xs !! 1
  | n == 3 = xs !! 0 == xs !! 1 && xs !! 1 == xs !! 2
  | otherwise = allTheSame''' (fst split) && allTheSame''' (snd split)
    where n = length xs
          split = splitAt (n `div` 2) xs

Solution 4

I just thought about this while writing this question:

allTheSame'''' :: (Eq a) => [a] -> Bool
allTheSame'''' xs = all (== head xs) (tail xs)

Questions

  1. I think Solution 0 is not very efficient, at least in terms of memory, because map will construct another list before applying and to its elements. Am I right?

  2. Solution 1 is still not very efficient, at least in terms of memory, because takeWhile will again build an additional list. Am I right?

  3. Solution 2 is tail recursive (right?), and it should be pretty efficient, because it will return False as soon as (xs !! 0 == xs !! 1) is False. Am I right?

  4. Solution 3 should be the best one, because it complexity should be O(log n)

  5. Solution 4 looks quite Haskellish to me (is it?), but it's probably the same as Solution 0, because all p = and . map p (from Prelude.hs). Am I right?

  6. Are there other better ways of writing allTheSame? Now, I expect someone will answer this question telling me that there's a build-in function that does this: I've searched with hoogle and I haven't found it. Anyway, since I'm learning Haskell, I believe that this was a good exercise for me :)

Any other comment is welcome. Thank you!

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5  
You seem to not be aware of the complexities of some of the operations you're performing: length is O(n) so you should really prefer pattern matching on the list over taking the length. Further it should be noted that indexing into a list at index i is O(i) and splitting a list in two is again O(n). (If all of those where O(1), your divide and conquer solution would still not have logarithmic runtime - it would be O(n log n)). –  sepp2k May 25 '11 at 10:26
1  
@sepp2k O(n*log(n)) is its current complexity. Given efficient length and splitAt it would run in O(n). However, it is just wrong. I think it returns True for [1,1,2,2]. –  Rotsor May 25 '11 at 13:34
2  
Note that and . map is the definition of all, making 0 and 4 equivalent. Source –  Dan Burton May 25 '11 at 18:45
    
wow! I was not expecting so many comments and answers! Thank you a lot! I will now go through all your stuff and comment :) –  MarcoS May 26 '11 at 6:51
    
@sepp2k: good point! I should use pattern matching. However I don't understand your final remark. Given that splitAt is O(n), then I understand that my Solution 3 is O(n lg n) (the depth of the tree is lg n, and at every level splitting is O(n)). However, why do you say it's O(n lg n) even if splitAt was O(1)? –  MarcoS May 26 '11 at 7:08

5 Answers 5

up vote 15 down vote accepted

gatoatigrado's answer gives some nice advice for measuring the performance of various solutions. Here is a more symbolic answer.

I think solution 0 (or, exactly equivalently, solution 4) will be the fastest. Remember that Haskell is lazy, so map will not have to construct the whole list before and is applied. A good way to build intuition about this is to play with infinity. So for example:

ghci> and $ map (< 1000) [1..]
False

This asks whether all numbers are less than 1,000. If map constructed the entire list before and were applied, then this question could never be answered. The expression will still answer quickly even if you give the list a very large right endpoint (that is, Haskell is not doing any "magic" depending on whether a list is infinite).

To start my example, let's use these definitions:

and [] = True
and (x:xs) = x && and xs

map f [] = []
map f (x:xs) = f x : map f xs

True && x = x
False && x = False

Here is the evaluation order for allTheSame [7,7,7,7,8,7,7,7]. There will be extra sharing that is too much of a pain to write down. I will also evaluate the head expression earlier than it would be for conciseness (it would have been evaluated anyway, so it's hardly different).

allTheSame [7,7,7,7,8,7,7,7]
allTheSame (7:7:7:7:8:7:7:7:[])
and $ map (== head (7:7:7:7:8:7:7:7:[])) (tail (7:7:7:7:8:7:7:7:[]))
and $ map (== 7)  (tail (7:7:7:7:8:7:7:7:[]))
and $ map (== 7)          (7:7:7:8:7:7:7:[])
and $ (== 7) 7 : map (== 7) (7:7:8:7:7:7:[])
(== 7) 7 && and (map (== 7) (7:7:8:7:7:7:[]))
True     && and (map (== 7) (7:7:8:7:7:7:[]))
            and (map (== 7) (7:7:8:7:7:7:[]))
(== 7) 7 && and (map (== 7)   (7:8:7:7:7:[]))
True     && and (map (== 7)   (7:8:7:7:7:[]))
            and (map (== 7)   (7:8:7:7:7:[]))
(== 7) 7 && and (map (== 7)     (8:7:7:7:[]))
True     && and (map (== 7)     (8:7:7:7:[]))
            and (map (== 7)     (8:7:7:7:[]))
(== 7) 8 && and (map (== 7)       (7:7:7:[]))
False    && and (map (== 7)       (7:7:7:[]))
False

See how we didn't even have to check the last 3 7's? This is lazy evaluation making a list work more like a loop. All your other solutions use expensive functions like length (which have to walk all the way to the end of the list to give an answer), so they will be less efficient and also they will not work on infinite lists. Working on infinite lists and being efficient often go together in Haskell.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm glad that you wrote this answer. After I finished mine I thought that a manual evaluation would be useful but didn't want to get even longer. Although I don't think it's sensible to use any variant of allTheSame on an infinite list... –  John L May 25 '11 at 10:24
    
Yeah, it only terminates when the answer is False ;-). –  luqui May 25 '11 at 10:52
    
great! thank you for taking the time for writing the example: it has been really helpful for me to understand how lazy evaluation works, and I have to keep this in mind for the future :) –  MarcoS May 26 '11 at 7:37

First of all, I don't think you want to be working with lists. A lot of your algorithms rely upon calculating the length, which is bad. You may want to consider the vector package, which will give you O(1) length compared to O(n) for a list. Vectors are also much more memory efficient, particularly if you can use Unboxed or Storable variants.

That being said, you really need to consider traversals and usage patterns in your code. Haskell's lists are very efficient if they can be generated on demand and consumed once. This means that you shouldn't hold on to references to a list. Something like this:

average xs = sum xs / length xs

requires that the entire list be retained in memory (by either sum or length) until both traversals are completed. If you can do your list traversal in one step, it'll be much more efficient.

Of course, you may need to retain the list anyway, such as to check if all the elements are equal, and if they aren't, do something else with the data. In this case, with lists of any size you're probably better off with a more compact data structure (e.g. vector).

Now that this is out of they way, here's a look at each of these functions. Where I show core, it was generated with ghc-7.0.3 -O -ddump-simpl. Also, don't bother judging Haskell code performance when compiled with -O0. Compile it with the flags you would actually use for production code, typically at least -O and maybe other options too.

Solution 0

allTheSame :: (Eq a) => [a] -> Bool
allTheSame xs = and $ map (== head xs) (tail xs)

GHC produces this Core:

Test.allTheSame
  :: forall a_abG. GHC.Classes.Eq a_abG => [a_abG] -> GHC.Bool.Bool
[GblId,
 Arity=2,
 Str=DmdType LS,
 Unf=Unf{Src=<vanilla>, TopLvl=True, Arity=2, Value=True,
         ConLike=True, Cheap=True, Expandable=True,
         Guidance=IF_ARGS [3 3] 16 0}]
Test.allTheSame =
  \ (@ a_awM)
    ($dEq_awN :: GHC.Classes.Eq a_awM)
    (xs_abH :: [a_awM]) ->
    case xs_abH of _ {
      [] ->
        GHC.List.tail1
        `cast` (CoUnsafe (forall a1_axH. [a1_axH]) GHC.Bool.Bool
                :: (forall a1_axH. [a1_axH]) ~ GHC.Bool.Bool);
      : ds1_axJ xs1_axK ->
        letrec {
          go_sDv [Occ=LoopBreaker] :: [a_awM] -> GHC.Bool.Bool
          [LclId, Arity=1, Str=DmdType S]
          go_sDv =
            \ (ds_azk :: [a_awM]) ->
              case ds_azk of _ {
                [] -> GHC.Bool.True;
                : y_azp ys_azq ->
                  case GHC.Classes.== @ a_awM $dEq_awN y_azp ds1_axJ of _ {
                    GHC.Bool.False -> GHC.Bool.False; GHC.Bool.True -> go_sDv ys_azq
                  }
              }; } in
        go_sDv xs1_axK
    }

This looks pretty good, actually. It will produce an error with an empty list, but that's easily fixed. This is the case xs_abH of _ { [] ->. After this GHC performed a worker/wrapper transformation, the recursive worker function is the letrec { go_sDv binding. The worker examines its argument. If [], it's reached the end of the list and returns True. Otherwise it compares the head of the remaining to the first element and either returns False or checks the rest of the list.

Three other features.

  1. The map was entirely fused away and doesn't allocate a temporary list.
  2. Near the top of the definition notice the Cheap=True statement. This means GHC considers the function "cheap", and thus a candidate for inlining. At a call site, if a concrete argument type can be determined, GHC will probably inline allTheSame and produce a very tight inner loop, completely bypassing the Eq dictionary lookup.
  3. The worker function is tail-recursive.

Verdict: Very strong contender.

Solution 1

allTheSame' :: (Eq a) => [a] -> Bool
allTheSame' xs = (length xs) == (length $ takeWhile (== head xs) xs)

Even without looking at core I know this won't be as good. The list is traversed more than once, first by length xs then by length $ takeWhile. Not only do you have the extra overhead of multiple traversals, it means that the list must be retained in memory after the first traversal and can't be GC'd. For a big list, this is a serious problem.

Test.allTheSame'
  :: forall a_abF. GHC.Classes.Eq a_abF => [a_abF] -> GHC.Bool.Bool
[GblId,
 Arity=2,
 Str=DmdType LS,
 Unf=Unf{Src=<vanilla>, TopLvl=True, Arity=2, Value=True,
         ConLike=True, Cheap=True, Expandable=True,
         Guidance=IF_ARGS [3 3] 20 0}]
Test.allTheSame' =
  \ (@ a_awF)
    ($dEq_awG :: GHC.Classes.Eq a_awF)
    (xs_abI :: [a_awF]) ->
    case GHC.List.$wlen @ a_awF xs_abI 0 of ww_aC6 { __DEFAULT ->
    case GHC.List.$wlen
           @ a_awF
           (GHC.List.takeWhile
              @ a_awF
              (let {
                 ds_sDq :: a_awF
                 [LclId, Str=DmdType]
                 ds_sDq =
                   case xs_abI of _ {
                     [] -> GHC.List.badHead @ a_awF; : x_axk ds1_axl -> x_axk
                   } } in
               \ (ds1_dxa :: a_awF) ->
                 GHC.Classes.== @ a_awF $dEq_awG ds1_dxa ds_sDq)
              xs_abI)
           0
    of ww1_XCn { __DEFAULT ->
    GHC.Prim.==# ww_aC6 ww1_XCn
    }
    }

Looking at the core doesn't tell much beyond that. However, note these lines:

case GHC.List.$wlen @ a_awF xs_abI 0 of ww_aC6 { __DEFAULT ->
        case GHC.List.$wlen

This is where the list traversals happen. The first gets the length of the outer list and binds it to ww_aC6. The second gets the length of the inner list, but the binding doesn't happen until near the bottom, at

of ww1_XCn { __DEFAULT ->
GHC.Prim.==# ww_aC6 ww1_XCn

The lengths (both Ints) can be unboxed and compared by a primop, but that's a small consolation after the overhead that's been introduced.

Verdict: Not good.

Solution 2

allTheSame'' :: (Eq a) => [a] -> Bool
allTheSame'' xs
  | n == 0 = False
  | n == 1 = True
  | n == 2 = xs !! 0 == xs !! 1
  | otherwise = (xs !! 0 == xs !! 1) && (allTheSame'' $ snd $ splitAt 2 xs)
    where  n = length xs

This has the same problem as solution 1. The list is traversed multiple times, and it can't be GC'd. It's worse here though, because now the length is calculated for each sub-list. I'd expect this to have the worst performance of all on lists of any significant size. Also, why are you special-casing lists of 1 and 2 elements when you're expecting the list to be big?

Verdict: Don't even think about it.

Solution 3

allTheSame''' :: (Eq a) => [a] -> Bool
allTheSame''' xs
  | n == 0 = False
  | n == 1 = True
  | n == 2 = xs !! 0 == xs !! 1
  | n == 3 = xs !! 0 == xs !! 1 && xs !! 1 == xs !! 2
  | otherwise = allTheSame''' (fst split) && allTheSame''' (snd split)
    where n = length xs
          split = splitAt (n `div` 2) xs

This has the same problem as Solution 2. Namely, the list is traversed multiple times by length. I'm not certain a divide-and-conquer approach is a good choice for this problem, it could end up taking longer than a simple scan. It would depend on the data though, and be worth testing.

Verdict: Maybe, if you used a different data structure.

Solution 4

allTheSame'''' :: (Eq a) => [a] -> Bool
allTheSame'''' xs = all (== head xs) (tail xs)

This was basically my first thought. Let's check the core again.

Test.allTheSame''''
  :: forall a_abC. GHC.Classes.Eq a_abC => [a_abC] -> GHC.Bool.Bool
[GblId,
 Arity=2,
 Str=DmdType LS,
 Unf=Unf{Src=<vanilla>, TopLvl=True, Arity=2, Value=True,
         ConLike=True, Cheap=True, Expandable=True,
         Guidance=IF_ARGS [3 3] 10 0}]
Test.allTheSame'''' =
  \ (@ a_am5)
    ($dEq_am6 :: GHC.Classes.Eq a_am5)
    (xs_alK :: [a_am5]) ->
    case xs_alK of _ {
      [] ->
        GHC.List.tail1
        `cast` (CoUnsafe (forall a1_axH. [a1_axH]) GHC.Bool.Bool
                :: (forall a1_axH. [a1_axH]) ~ GHC.Bool.Bool);
      : ds1_axJ xs1_axK ->
        GHC.List.all
          @ a_am5
          (\ (ds_dwU :: a_am5) ->
             GHC.Classes.== @ a_am5 $dEq_am6 ds_dwU ds1_axJ)
          xs1_axK
    }

Ok, not too bad. Like solution 1, this will error on empty lists. The list traversal is hidden in GHC.List.all, but it will probably be expanded to good code at a call site.

Verdict: Another strong contender.

So between all of these, with lists I'd expect that Solutions 0 and 4 are the only ones worth using, and they are pretty much the same. I might consider Option 3 in some cases.

Edit: in both cases, the errors on empty lists can be simply fixed as in @augustss's answer.

The next step would be to do some time profiling with criterion.

share|improve this answer
    
wow! impressive answer. I must admit that I don't understand anything looking at core code: that's far too advanced for me at the moment. However your explanations are very useful, and they gave me insight on many aspects and errors in my code. Thanks! –  MarcoS May 26 '11 at 8:04

Q1 -- Yeah, I think your simple solution is fine, there is no memory leak. Q4 -- Solution 3 is not log(n), via the very simple argument that you need to look at all list elements to determine whether they are the same, and looking at 1 element takes 1 time step. Q5 -- yes. Q6, see below.

The way to go about this is to type it in and run it

main = do
    print $ allTheSame (replicate 100000000 1)

then run ghc -O3 -optc-O3 --make Main.hs && time ./Main. I like the last solution best (you can also use pattern matching to clean it up a little),

allTheSame (x:xs) = all (==x) xs

Open up ghci and run ":step fcn" on these things. It will teach you a lot about what lazy evaluation is expanding. In general, when you match a constructor, e.g. "x:xs", that's constant time. When you call "length", Haskell needs to compute all of the elements in the list (though their values are still "to-be-computed"), so solution 1 and 2 are bad.

edit 1

Sorry if my previous answer was a bit shallow. It seems like expanding things manually does help a little (though compared to the other options, it's a trivial improvement),

{-# LANGUAGE BangPatterns #-}
allTheSame [] = True
allTheSame ((!x):xs) = go x xs where
    go !x [] = True
    go !x (!y:ys) = (x == y) && (go x ys)

It seems that ghc is specializing the function already, but you can look at the specialize pragma too, in case it doesn't work for your code [ link ].

share|improve this answer
2  
Inserting strict matching changes the semantics of the original function. –  augustss May 26 '11 at 1:14
    
Thank you for all the great comments! I like very your suggestion to clean up my last solution using pattern matching. Thank you also for suggesting :step ... but I still have to learn about gchi debugger: could you recommend a good tutorial? –  MarcoS May 26 '11 at 7:29
    
I didn't really use a tutorial, just start it up (ghci) and poke it, e.g. "let f = ...", "1+2", etc. Then, you can load files with ":l filename" or start ghci with "ghci Filename.hs". Also, I use ":r" to reload the file constantly. Type :help for a list of commands -- you should see ":step <expr> single-step into <expr>". cheers. –  gatoatigrado May 26 '11 at 19:48

A solution using the pairwise combinations:

allTheSame xs = and $ zipWith (==) xs (tail xs)
share|improve this answer

Here is another version (don't need to traverse whole list in case something doesn't match):

allTheSame [] = True
allTheSame (x:xs) = isNothing $ find (x /= ) xs

This may not be syntactically correct , but I hope you got the idea.

share|improve this answer
1  
Solutions 0 and 4 also don't traverse the whole list if a mismatch is found. –  augustss May 25 '11 at 11:46
    
isNothing can be used to make it shorter. –  Rotsor May 25 '11 at 13:50
    
great alternative idea that also teaches me about isNothing and find, which I didn't know. Thanks! –  MarcoS May 26 '11 at 8:10

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