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The whole story; I have some KeyValuePairs that I need to store in a session and my primary goal is to keep it small. Therefore I don't have the option of using many different collection. While the key is a different enum value of of a different enum type the value is always just a enum value of the same enum type. I have chosen a HashTable for this approach which content look like this (just many more):

// The Key-Value-Pairs
{ EnumTypA.ValueA1, MyEnum.ValueA },
{ EnumTypB.ValueB1, MyEnum.ValueB },
{ EnumTypC.ValueC1, MyEnum.ValueA },
{ EnumTypA.ValueA2, MyEnum.ValueC },
{ EnumTypB.ValueB1, MyEnum.ValueC }

At most I am running contains on that HashTable but for sure I also need to fetch the value at some point and I need to loop through all elements. That all works fine but now I have a new requirement to keep the order I have added them to the HashTable -> BANG

A HashTable is a map and that is not possible!

Now I thought about using a SortedList<object, MyEnum> or to go with more Data but slightly faster lookups and use a SortedSet<object> in addition to the HashTable.

Content below has been edited

The SortedList is implemented as

SortedList<Enum, MyEnum> mySortedList = new SortedList<Enum, MyEnum>();

the SortedSet is implemented as

SortedSet<Enum> mySortedSet = new SortedSet<Enum>();

The described Key - Value - Pairs are added to the sorted list with

void AddPair(Enum key, MyEnum value)
{
    mySortedList.Add(key, value);
}

And for the SortedSett like this

void AddPair(Enum key)
{
    mySortedSet.Add(key);
}

Both are failing with the exception:

Object must be the same type as the enum

My question is: What goes wrong and how can I archive my goal?

Used Solution

I've decided to life with the downside of redundant data against slower lookups and decided to implement a List<Enum> which will retain the insert order parallel to my already existing HashTable.

In my case I just have about 50-150 Elements so I decided to benchmark the Hashtable against the List<KeyValuePair<object,object>>

Therefore I have create me the following helper to implement ContainsKey() to the List<KeyValuePair<object,object>>

static bool ContainsKey(this List<KeyValuePair<object, object>> list, object key)
{
    foreach (KeyValuePair<object, object> p in list)
    {
        if (p.Key.Equals(key))
            return true;
    }
    return false;
}

I inserted the same 100 Entries and checked randomly for one of ten different entries in a 300000 loop. And... the difference was tiny so I decided to go with the List<KeyValuePair<object,object>>

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you should store your data in an instance of List<KeyValuePair<Enum, MyEnum>> or Dictionary<Enum, MyEnum>.

SortedSet and SortedList are generic, but your keys are EnumTypeA/EnumTypeB, you need to specify the generic T with their base class(System.Enum) like:

SortedList<Enum, MyEnum> sorted = new SortedList<Enum, MyEnum>();

EDIT

Why you got this exception

SortedList and SortedSet use a comparer inside to check if two keys are equal. Comparer<Enum>.Default will be used as the comparer if you didn't specify the comparer in the constructor. Unfortunately Comparer<Enum>.Default isn't implemented as you expected. It throws the exception if the two enums are not the same type.

How to resolve the problem

If you don't want to use a List<KeyValuePair<Enum, MyEnum>> and insist using SortedLIst, you need to specify a comparer to the constructor like this:

class EnumComparer : IComparer<Enum>
{
    public int Compare(Enum x, Enum y)
    {
        return x.GetHashCode() - y.GetHashCode();
    }
}

var sorted = new SortedList<Enum, MyEnum>(new EnumComparer());

Btw, I think you need to obtain the "inserting order"? If so, List<KeyValuePair<K,V>> is a better choice, because SortedSet will prevent duplicated items.

share|improve this answer
    
@Danny to change the SortedList or SortedSet that way does not change the error. And does a dictionary or list obtain the insert order? –  sra May 25 '11 at 8:39
1  
@Danny it's explained in the question; The exception says Object must be the same type as the enum I though the usage should be obvious but I will add some code right after this comment –  sra May 25 '11 at 8:49
1  
"Unfortunately Comparer<Enum>.Default isn't implemented wisely. It throws the exception if the two enums are not the same type." Why do you call this unwise? I can think of no better behavior since there is no reasonable way to order different types. –  CodesInChaos May 25 '11 at 9:58
2  
Your comparer is incorrect. It needs a insertion timestamp, and not based on the enum's value. Create a wrapper class eg { Enum, DateTime }. –  leppie May 25 '11 at 10:05
1  
@sra: You are not sorting according to value, but according to the way you added them to the list. Hence it will require some form of timestamp. IMO, if the list is small, just use List<KVPair<K,V>>, then you dont need to worry about all this extra shit. –  leppie May 25 '11 at 10:37

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