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Is the following code valid to check if a CPU supports the SSE3 instruction set?

Using the IsProcessorFeaturePresent() function apparently does not work on Windows XP (see http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms724482(v=vs.85).aspx).

bool CheckSSE3()
{
    int CPUInfo[4] = {-1};

    //-- Get number of valid info ids
    __cpuid(CPUInfo, 0);
    int nIds = CPUInfo[0];

    //-- Get info for id "1"
    if (nIds >= 1)
    {
        __cpuid(CPUInfo, 1);
        bool bSSE3NewInstructions = (CPUInfo[2] & 0x1) || false;
        return bSSE3NewInstructions;     
    }

    return false;      
}
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1  
It seems correct, as far as I can tell from reading Intel® 64 and IA-32 Architectures Software Developer’s Manual Volume 2 (2A & 2B): Instruction Set Reference, A-Z, page 284. Also, bit 9 of CPUInfo[2] signals supplemental SSE3 instructions. –  Norbert P. May 25 '11 at 15:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 34 down vote accepted

I've created a GitHub repro that will detect CPU and OS support for all the major x86 ISA extensions: https://github.com/Mysticial/FeatureDetector

Here's a shorter version:


First you need to access the CPUID instruction:

#ifdef _WIN32

//  Windows
#define cpuid(info,x)    __cpuidex(info,x,0)

#else

//  GCC Inline Assembly
void cpuid(int CPUInfo[4],int InfoType){
    __asm__ __volatile__ (
        "cpuid":
        "=a" (CPUInfo[0]),
        "=b" (CPUInfo[1]),
        "=c" (CPUInfo[2]),
        "=d" (CPUInfo[3]) :
        "a" (InfoType), "c" (0)
    );
}

#endif

Then you can run the following code:

//  Misc.
bool HW_MMX;
bool HW_x64;
bool HW_ABM;      // Advanced Bit Manipulation
bool HW_RDRAND;
bool HW_BMI1;
bool HW_BMI2;
bool HW_ADX;
bool HW_PREFETCHWT1;

//  SIMD: 128-bit
bool HW_SSE;
bool HW_SSE2;
bool HW_SSE3;
bool HW_SSSE3;
bool HW_SSE41;
bool HW_SSE42;
bool HW_SSE4a;
bool HW_AES;
bool HW_SHA;

//  SIMD: 256-bit
bool HW_AVX;
bool HW_XOP;
bool HW_FMA3;
bool HW_FMA4;
bool HW_AVX2;

//  SIMD: 512-bit
bool HW_AVX512F;    //  AVX512 Foundation
bool HW_AVX512CD;   //  AVX512 Conflict Detection
bool HW_AVX512PF;   //  AVX512 Prefetch
bool HW_AVX512ER;   //  AVX512 Exponential + Reciprocal
bool HW_AVX512VL;   //  AVX512 Vector Length Extensions
bool HW_AVX512BW;   //  AVX512 Byte + Word
bool HW_AVX512DQ;   //  AVX512 Doubleword + Quadword
bool HW_AVX512IFMA; //  AVX512 Integer 52-bit Fused Multiply-Add
bool HW_AVX512VBMI; //  AVX512 Vector Byte Manipulation Instructions

int info[4];
cpuid(info, 0);
int nIds = info[0];

cpuid(info, 0x80000000);
unsigned nExIds = info[0];

//  Detect Features
if (nIds >= 0x00000001){
    cpuid(info,0x00000001);
    HW_MMX    = (info[3] & ((int)1 << 23)) != 0;
    HW_SSE    = (info[3] & ((int)1 << 25)) != 0;
    HW_SSE2   = (info[3] & ((int)1 << 26)) != 0;
    HW_SSE3   = (info[2] & ((int)1 <<  0)) != 0;

    HW_SSSE3  = (info[2] & ((int)1 <<  9)) != 0;
    HW_SSE41  = (info[2] & ((int)1 << 19)) != 0;
    HW_SSE42  = (info[2] & ((int)1 << 20)) != 0;
    HW_AES    = (info[2] & ((int)1 << 25)) != 0;

    HW_AVX    = (info[2] & ((int)1 << 28)) != 0;
    HW_FMA3   = (info[2] & ((int)1 << 12)) != 0;

    HW_RDRAND = (info[2] & ((int)1 << 30)) != 0;
}
if (nIds >= 0x00000007){
    cpuid(info,0x00000007);
    HW_AVX2   = (info[1] & ((int)1 <<  5)) != 0;

    HW_BMI1        = (info[1] & ((int)1 <<  3)) != 0;
    HW_BMI2        = (info[1] & ((int)1 <<  8)) != 0;
    HW_ADX         = (info[1] & ((int)1 << 19)) != 0;
    HW_SHA         = (info[1] & ((int)1 << 29)) != 0;
    HW_PREFETCHWT1 = (info[2] & ((int)1 <<  0)) != 0;

    HW_AVX512F     = (info[1] & ((int)1 << 16)) != 0;
    HW_AVX512CD    = (info[1] & ((int)1 << 28)) != 0;
    HW_AVX512PF    = (info[1] & ((int)1 << 26)) != 0;
    HW_AVX512ER    = (info[1] & ((int)1 << 27)) != 0;
    HW_AVX512VL    = (info[1] & ((int)1 << 31)) != 0;
    HW_AVX512BW    = (info[1] & ((int)1 << 30)) != 0;
    HW_AVX512DQ    = (info[1] & ((int)1 << 17)) != 0;
    HW_AVX512IFMA  = (info[1] & ((int)1 << 21)) != 0;
    HW_AVX512VBMI  = (info[2] & ((int)1 <<  1)) != 0;
}
if (nExIds >= 0x80000001){
    cpuid(info,0x80000001);
    HW_x64   = (info[3] & ((int)1 << 29)) != 0;
    HW_ABM   = (info[2] & ((int)1 <<  5)) != 0;
    HW_SSE4a = (info[2] & ((int)1 <<  6)) != 0;
    HW_FMA4  = (info[2] & ((int)1 << 16)) != 0;
    HW_XOP   = (info[2] & ((int)1 << 11)) != 0;
}

Note that this only detects whether the CPU supports the instructions. To actually run them, you also need to have operating system support.

Specifically, operating system support is required for:

  • x64 instructions. (You need a 64-bit OS.)
  • Instructions that use the (AVX) 256-bit ymm registers. See Andy Lutomirski's answer for how to detect this.
  • Instructions that use the (AVX512) 512-bit zmm and mask registers. Detecting OS support for AVX512 is the same as with AVX, but using the flag 0xe6 instead of 0x6.
share|improve this answer
1  
Note for others like me: Read the question carefully - the __cpuid intrinsic is MSVC only. –  slugchewer Feb 21 '13 at 21:09
    
@slugchewer Good point. In GCC, I believe you need to use inline assembly. Lemme see if I can find an already existing solution. –  Mysticial Feb 21 '13 at 21:11
    
@slugchewer I've added an inline assembly version that should work for GCC, ICC, and possibly Clang as well. I haven't tested it yet. So let me know if it breaks. –  Mysticial Feb 21 '13 at 21:29
    
I can confirm it works in GCC 4.4.6 / Clang 3.2. Thanks! –  slugchewer Feb 22 '13 at 22:20
    
Great little code snippet, thanks a lot for sharing! –  Violet Giraffe Feb 23 '13 at 17:46

Mysticial's answer is a bit dangerous -- it explains how to detect CPU support but not OS support. You need to use _xgetbv to check whether the OS has enabled the required CPU extended state. See here for another source. Even gcc has made the same mistake. The meat of the code is:

bool avxSupported = false;

int cpuInfo[4];
__cpuid(cpuInfo, 1);

bool osUsesXSAVE_XRSTORE = cpuInfo[2] & (1 << 27) || false;
bool cpuAVXSuport = cpuInfo[2] & (1 << 28) || false;

if (osUsesXSAVE_XRSTORE && cpuAVXSuport)
{
    unsigned long long xcrFeatureMask = _xgetbv(_XCR_XFEATURE_ENABLED_MASK);
    avxSupported = (xcrFeatureMask & 0x6) == 0x6;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1, so I didn't have to look up and test it myself. I'll keep my answer specific to whether the CPU supports it and point to yours about proper OS support for 256-bit AVX. –  Mysticial Mar 20 '14 at 1:33

After quite a bit of googling, I also found the solutions from Intel:

Link: https://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/how-to-detect-new-instruction-support-in-the-4th-generation-intel-core-processor-family

    void cpuid(uint32_t eax, uint32_t ecx, uint32_t* abcd) {
#if defined(_MSC_VER)
            __cpuidex((int*)abcd, eax, ecx);
#else
            uint32_t ebx, edx;
# if defined( __i386__ ) && defined ( __PIC__ )
            /* in case of PIC under 32-bit EBX cannot be clobbered */
            __asm__("movl %%ebx, %%edi \n\t cpuid \n\t xchgl %%ebx, %%edi" : "=D" (ebx),
# else
            __asm__("cpuid" : "+b" (ebx),
# endif
            "+a" (eax), "+c" (ecx), "=d" (edx));
            abcd[0] = eax; abcd[1] = ebx; abcd[2] = ecx; abcd[3] = edx;
#endif
    }

    int check_xcr0_ymm()
    {
        uint32_t xcr0;
#if defined(_MSC_VER)
        xcr0 = (uint32_t)_xgetbv(0);  /* min VS2010 SP1 compiler is required */
#else
        __asm__("xgetbv" : "=a" (xcr0) : "c" (0) : "%edx");
#endif
        return ((xcr0 & 6) == 6); /* checking if xmm and ymm state are enabled in XCR0 */
    }

Also note that GCC has some special intrinsics that you can use (see: http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/X86-Built-in-Functions.html ):

    if (__builtin_cpu_supports("avx2"))
    // ...

If you put this together with the information above, it'll all work out fine.

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