Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a map which represents a configuration. It's a map of std::string and boost::any.

This map is initialized at the start and I'd like the user to be able to override these options on the command line.

What I'd love to do is build the program options from this map using the options_description::add_option() method. However, it takes a template argument po::value<> whereas all I have is boost::any.

So far, I just have the shell of the code. m_Config represents my configuration class, and getTuples() returns a std::map<std::string, Tuple>. TuplePair is a typedef of std::pair<std::string, Tuple> and the Tuple contains the boost::any I am interested in.

    po::options_description desc;
    std::for_each(m_Config.getTuples().begin(),
                  m_Config.getTuples().end(),
                  [&desc](const TuplePair& _pair)
    {
            // what goes here? :)
            // desc.add_options() ( _pair.first, po::value<???>, "");
    });

Is there a way to build it this way, or do I need to resort to doing it myself?

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
Can't you just assign string to all of your parameters since you are using boost::any? Then later convert as needed? I don't see any other way unless you also store the "preferred type" for that argument. –  RedX May 25 '11 at 10:20
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted

boost::any is not applicable to your problem. It performs the most basic form of type erasure: storage and (type-safe) retrieval, and that's it. As you've seen, no other operations can be performed. As jhasse points out, you could just test every type you want to support, but this is a maintenance nightmare.

Better would be to expand upon the idea boost::any uses. Unfortunately this requires a bit of boiler-plate code. If you'd like to try it, there's a new Boost library being discussed right now on the mailing list (titled "[boost] RFC: type erasure") that is essentially a generalized type erasure utility: you define the operations you'd like your erased type to support, and it generates the proper utility type. (It can simulate boost::any, for example, by requiring the erased type be copy-constructible and type-safe, and can simulate boost::function<> by additionally requiring the type be callable.)

Aside from that, though, your best option is probably to write such a type yourself. I'll do it for you:

#include <boost/program_options.hpp>
#include <typeinfo>
#include <stdexcept>

namespace po = boost::program_options;

class any_option
{
public: 
    any_option() :
    mContent(0) // no content
    {}

    template <typename T>
    any_option(const T& value) :
    mContent(new holder<T>(value))
    {
        // above is where the erasure happens,
        // holder<T> inherits from our non-template
        // base class, which will make virtual calls
        // to the actual implementation; see below
    }

    any_option(const any_option& other) :
    mContent(other.empty() ? 0 : other.mContent->clone())
    {
        // note we need an explicit clone method to copy,
        // since with an erased type it's impossible
    }

    any_option& operator=(any_option other)
    {
        // copy-and-swap idiom is short and sweet
        swap(*this, other);

        return *this;
    }

    ~any_option()
    {
        // delete our content when we're done
        delete mContent;
    }

    bool empty() const
    {
        return !mContent;
    }

    friend void swap(any_option& first, any_option& second)
    {
        std::swap(first.mContent, second.mContent);
    }

    // now we define the interface we'd like to support through erasure:

    // getting the data out if we know the type will be useful,
    // just like boost::any. (defined as friend free-function)
    template <typename T>
    friend T* any_option_cast(any_option*);

    // and the ability to query the type
    const std::type_info& type() const
    {
        return mContent->type(); // call actual function
    }

    // we also want to be able to call options_description::add_option(),
    // so we add a function that will do so (through a virtual call)
    void add_option(po::options_description desc, const char* name)
    {
        mContent->add_option(desc, name); // call actual function
    }

private:
    // done with the interface, now we define the non-template base class,
    // which has virtual functions where we need type-erased functionality
    class placeholder
    {
    public:
        virtual ~placeholder()
        {
            // allow deletion through base with virtual destructor
        }

        // the interface needed to support any_option operations:

        // need to be able to clone the stored value
        virtual placeholder* clone() const = 0;

        // need to be able to test the stored type, for safe casts
        virtual const std::type_info& type() const = 0;

        // and need to be able to perform add_option with type info
        virtual void add_option(po::options_description desc,
                                    const char* name) = 0;
    };

    // and the template derived class, which will support the interface
    template <typename T>
    class holder : public placeholder
    {
    public:
        holder(const T& value) :
        mValue(value)
        {}

        // implement the required interface:
        placeholder* clone() const
        {
            return new holder<T>(mValue);
        }

        const std::type_info& type() const
        {
            return typeid(mValue);
        }

        void add_option(po::options_description desc, const char* name)
        {
            desc.add_options()(name, po::value<T>(), "");
        }

        // finally, we have a direct value accessor
        T& value()
        {
            return mValue;
        }

    private:
        T mValue;

        // noncopyable, use cloning interface
        holder(const holder&);
        holder& operator=(const holder&);
    };

    // finally, we store a pointer to the base class
    placeholder* mContent;
};

class bad_any_option_cast :
    public std::bad_cast
{
public:
    const char* what() const throw()
    {
        return "bad_any_option_cast: failed conversion";
    }
};

template <typename T>
T* any_option_cast(any_option* anyOption)
{
    typedef any_option::holder<T> holder;

    return anyOption.type() == typeid(T) ? 
            &static_cast<holder*>(anyOption.mContent)->value() : 0; 
}

template <typename T>
const T* any_option_cast(const any_option* anyOption)
{
    // none of the operations in non-const any_option_cast
    // are mutating, so this is safe and simple (constness
    // is restored to the return value automatically)
    return any_option_cast<T>(const_cast<any_option*>(anyOption));
}

template <typename T>
T& any_option_cast(any_option& anyOption)
{
    T* result = any_option_cast(&anyOption);
    if (!result)
        throw bad_any_option_cast();

    return *result;
}

template <typename T>
const T& any_option_cast(const any_option& anyOption)
{
    return any_option_cast<T>(const_cast<any_option&>(anyOption));
}

// NOTE: My casting operator has slightly different use than
// that of boost::any. Namely, it automatically returns a reference
// to the stored value, so you don't need to (and cannot) specify it.
// If you liked the old way, feel free to peek into their source.

#include <boost/foreach.hpp>
#include <map>

int main()
{
    // (it's a good exercise to step through this with
    //  a debugger to see how it all comes together)
    typedef std::map<std::string, any_option> map_type;
    typedef map_type::value_type pair_type;

    map_type m;

    m.insert(std::make_pair("int", any_option(5)));
    m.insert(std::make_pair("double", any_option(3.14)));

    po::options_description desc;

    BOOST_FOREACH(pair_type& pair, m)
    {
        pair.second.add_option(desc, pair.first.c_str());
    }

    // etc.
}

Let me know if something is unclear. :)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank-you so much. I've spent the last 3 hours converting my original Tuple class to this AnyOption and it works a dream. The only addition I made was an additional function to compliment add_option called from_option to cover the variables_map::as<T> case when bringing the data back. Thanks for this concise, flexible solution! –  Moo-Juice May 25 '11 at 19:34
2  
+1, sweet sweet type erasure. :) –  Xeo May 25 '11 at 19:37
    
Beautiful solution and beautiful coding :) –  Quizzical Dec 17 '11 at 15:24
add comment
template<class T>
bool any_is(const boost::any& a)
{
    try
    {
        boost::any_cast<const T&>(a);
        return true;
    }
    catch(boost::bad_any_cast&)
    {
        return false;
    }
}

// ...

    po::options_description desc;
    std::for_each(m_Config.getTuples().begin(),
                  m_Config.getTuples().end(),
                  [&desc](const TuplePair& _pair)
    {
        if(any_is<int>(_pair.first))
        {
            desc.add_options() { _pair.first, po::value<int>, ""};
        }
        else if(any_is<std::string>(_pair.first))
        {
            desc.add_options() { _pair.first, po::value<std::string>, ""};
        }
        else
        {
            // ...
        }
    });

// ...

If you have more than a handful of types consider using typelists.

share|improve this answer
1  
I believe one would use _pair.second.type() == typeid(int) etc. –  kloffy May 25 '11 at 12:27
    
You're right. I didn't see that function, thanks :) –  jhasse Jun 1 '11 at 9:19
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.