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just wondering which approach would be better if both blocks of code would yield the same result:


string  from = ddFrom.SelectedItem.ToString(),
            to = ddTo.SelectedItem.ToString();

switch(from)
{
    case "celsius":
        switch(to)
        {
            case "celsius":
                break;
            case "fahrenheit":
                break;
            case "kelvin":
                break;
        }
        break;

    case "fahrenheit":
        switch(to)
        {
            case "celsius":
                break;
            case "fahrenheit":
                break;
            case "kelvin":
                break;
        }
        break;

    case "kelvin":
        switch(to)
        {
            case "celsius":
                break;
            case "fahrenheit":
                break;
            case "kelvin":
                break;
        }
        break;
}

or this one:


string  from = ddFrom.SelectedItem.ToString(),
            to = ddTo.SelectedItem.ToString(),
            conversion = from + to;

switch(conversion)
{
    case "celsiusfahrenheit":
        break;
    case "celsiuskelvin":
        break;
    case "fahrenheitcelsius":
        break;
    case "fahrenheitkelvin":
        break;
    case "kelvincelsius":
        break;
    case "kelvinfahrenheit":
        break;
}

Thanks.

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4  
Both of these are terrible. You're hard-coding identifiers, switching on strings, and throwing object orientation to the wind. Why don't you drop that and try method overloading instead? –  Cody Gray May 25 '11 at 10:10
    
Hi Cody, thanks for your comments. Unfortunately, we're not discussing OOP yet. So yeah, maybe when we do go through OOP I'd understand what you're talking about :) –  dork May 26 '11 at 0:16
2  
Not sure how you learn C# separately from OOP. That must be very confusing. –  Cody Gray May 26 '11 at 9:09
    
You should discuss OOP, and then learn C#. You can't learn to you use a tool unless you know what it's for. –  Hugo Aug 11 '12 at 20:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Second option is preferable because, as everyone has said, it makes the code look and feel better.

However, you might want to consider a more architected option:

public class TemperatureConverter
{
    private static readonly IDictionary<Tuple<string, string>, Func<double, double>> ConverterMap =
        new Dictionary<Tuple<string, string>, Func<double, double>>
        {
            { Tuple.Create("celsius", "kelvin"), t => t + 273 },
            // add similar lines to convert from/to other measurements
        }

    public static double Convert(double degrees, string fromType, string toType)
    {
        fromType = fromType.ToLowerInvariant();
        toType = toType.ToLowerInvariant();
        if (fromType == toType) {
            return degrees; // no conversion necessary
        }

        return ConverterMap[Tuple.Create(fromType, toType)](degrees);
    }
}

Usage:

TemperatureConverter.Convert(0, "celcius", "kelvin");

Of course this can be further improved (using enumeration values instead of strings for the temperature types comes to mind first, also some error checking is in order), but the general idea is there.

IMHO this is a good middle ground approach between the old school C-style mega-switch and a full-fledged OO approach (no real need for OO here because this specific conversion problem has a very simple domain model).

share|improve this answer
    
Upvoting this, even though I disagree that there's no need for OO. It still makes the code far more readable, especially for things that have such natural similarity as temperature values. And I strongly agree that an enum would be preferable. –  Cody Gray May 25 '11 at 10:24
    
@CodyGray: my first reaction was to have an ITempConverter with CelsiusTempConverter, KelvinTempConverter etc as implementors. ITempConverter.ToNormalized and ITempConverter.FromNormalized would take care of the conversion as in result = targetConverter.FromNormalized(sourceConverter.ToNormalized(input));, where "normalized" is your choice of intermediate representation. But after a little thought it definitely felt more heavyweight than necessary. –  Jon May 25 '11 at 10:36
    
Thanks Jon. Too bad we're still using VS 2008, so we don't have Tuples. But I'll keep this bookmarked. :) –  dork May 26 '11 at 0:43

The, second one would be better for fast result and less coding as it is giving the Same result.

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It is better to restructure your code, so you have temperature scale classes and an abstract factory that returns a corresponding instance basing an input string:

public interface ITemperatureScale
{
    double GetAbsoluteValue();
    ITemperatureScale ConvertTo(ITemperatureScale temperatureScale);
}

public class CelciusScale : ITemperatureScale
{
    public double GetAbsoluteValue()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public ITemperatureScale ConvertTo(ITemperatureScale temperatureScale)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

public class FarScale : ITemperatureScale
{
    public double GetAbsoluteValue()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public ITemperatureScale ConvertTo(ITemperatureScale temperatureScale)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

public class KelvinScale: ITemperatureScale
{
    public double GetAbsoluteValue()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public ITemperatureScale ConvertTo(ITemperatureScale temperatureScale)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

public static class TemperatureScaleProvider
{
    private const string SCALE_CELSIUS = "celsius";
    private const string SCALE_KELVIN = "kelvin";
    private const string SCALE_FAHRENHEIT = "fahrenheit";

    public static ITemperatureScale GetFromString(string temperatureScaleString)
    {
        //Some input checks here
        switch (temperatureScaleString.ToLowerInvariant())
        {
            case (SCALE_CELSIUS):
                return new CelciusScale();
            case (SCALE_KELVIN):
                return new KelvinScale();
            case (SCALE_FAHRENHEIT):
                return new FarScale();
            default:
                throw new ArgumentException("temperatureScaleString");
        }

    }
}

Usage will be:

        ITemperatureScale fromScale = TemperatureScaleProvider.GetFromString("celcius");
        ITemperatureScale toScale = TemperatureScaleProvider.GetFromString("KELvIN");
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I think second one is better, straight forward and more readable. Second approach would be more easy to maintain, modify and expand in future if needed.

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option #2 seems cleaner and would yield the same result

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