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Here is the file

303620.43,6187793.62
303663.61,6187757.08
303652.22,6187702.51
303580.10,6187685.43
303551.63,6187737.15
303574.88,6187775.11
303610.94,6187773.69

When it is reversed I get

303610.94,6187773.69303574.88,6187775.11
303551.63,6187737.15
303580.10,6187685.43
303652.22,6187702.51
303663.61,6187757.08
303620.43,6187793.62

How do I ensure that the Last line when reversed has a '\n' ?

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2  
Can you show us your code? –  Björn Pollex May 25 '11 at 11:53
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3 Answers

In your code, after you've read a line, check that it ends in '\n'. If it doesn't, append a '\n' and carry on as you're doing already.

The endswith method will probably come in handy.

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Use rstrip to remove the newline (and other trailing whitespace) off all lines, then rely on print to put it back in.

a = [ln.rstrip() for ln in open('datafile.txt')]
a.reverse()
for ln in a:
    print(ln)
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Or if you're not writing code that prints this to stdout, then you can always just add it back when re-saving the file (ie. your_write_handle.write(a + '\n') –  Rob Bailey May 25 '11 at 12:30
    
Thank you that works Fine ! –  Rudy Van Drie May 25 '11 at 21:54
    
@Rudy: if it works, then please click the checkmark next to the answer to accept it. –  larsmans May 25 '11 at 21:54
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+1 for larsmans response.An other solution is to use the splitlines method of string objects:

myFile = open(filePath, 'r')
lines = myFile.read().splitlines() #by default splitlines removes trailing '\n'
myFile.close()
lines.reverse()
for line in lines:
    print line
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Thank you all... slowly getting a handle on Python –  Rudy Van Drie Mar 25 '12 at 21:52
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