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I have a class like below

public abstract class ABC
{

int _a;

  public ABC(int a)
  {
    _a = a;

   }

public abstract void computeA();

};

Is it mandatory for the derived class to supply the parameters for the base/abstract class constructor? Is there any way to initialize the derived class without supplying the parameters?

Thanks in advance,

John

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, you have to supply an argument to the base class constructor.

Of course, the derived class may have a parameterless constructor - it can call the base class constructor any way it wants. For example:

public class Foo : ABC
{
    // Always pass 123 to the base class constructor
    public Foo() : base(123)
    {
    }
}

So you don't necessarily need to pass any information to the derived class constructor, but the derived class constructor must pass information to the base class constructor, if that only exposes a parameterized constructor.

(Note that in real code Foo would also have to override computeA(), but that's irrelevant to the constructor part of the question, so I left it out of the sample.)

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3  
Damn... Beat me too it... And 123 does seem to be a popular default value. :-) –  Colin Mackay May 25 '11 at 11:56

You can create a default constructor in a derived class that does not need parameters and the derived class will supply default values, but you cannot remove the requirement entirely. It is a manadatory condition of the base class to have some sort of value.

public MyDerivedClass : ABC
{
  public MyDerivedClass()
    : base(123) // hard wired default value for the base class
  {
    // Other things the constructor needs to do.
  }

  public override void computeA()
  {
    // Concrete definition for this method. 
  }
}
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1  
+1 for including the override - which someone else omitted ;-) –  Marijn May 25 '11 at 11:59
    
@Marijn: I omitted it on the grounds of it not being relevant to the constructor call, that's all :) –  Jon Skeet May 25 '11 at 12:26
    
I figured ... for a short moment I considered placing a nitpicking comment below the post, but was too intimidated by the 300k+ reputation of the author. –  Marijn May 25 '11 at 13:18
    
@Jon Skeet: But seriously, given the question, I find that this is a better answer. "it compiles" and doesn't give raise to another question. –  Marijn May 25 '11 at 19:20
    
@Marijn: Will edit my answer to add it - not the code, just an explanation. –  Jon Skeet May 25 '11 at 19:22

Add a default constructor to the base class and call the other constructor providing an initial values for its parameters:

public abstract class ABC
{
    int _a;  
    public ABC(int a)  
    {    
         _a = a;   
    }

    public ABC() : this(0) {}    
}
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Shouldn't that be public ABC() : this(0) {} instead? –  LukeH May 25 '11 at 12:06
    
@LukeH: Is the above statement incorrect? –  Akram Shahda May 25 '11 at 12:15
    
Yes, it's incorrect. If you want to chain constructors then you need to use the public ABC() : this(0) {} syntax; you can't chain a call to a constructor from inside the body of another constructor. –  LukeH May 25 '11 at 12:22
    
@LukeH: Thanx a lot ... –  Akram Shahda May 25 '11 at 12:23

It doesn't have much to do with the fact that the base class is abstract.

Because you've declared a public constructor that has 1 parameter, the compiler removes the basic empty constructor.

So, if you want to create an instance of that class, you have to pass a parameter.

When you derive from such a class, a parameter must be passed to the base class for it o construct.

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