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I've come across a rather odd problem. I have the following sample data to work with in a mysql database:

    |key| data| index | total | timestamp           |
    | # |  a | 1     | 2     | 2009-01-02 01:01:32 |
    | $ |  b | 2     | 2     | 2009-01-02 01:03:32 |
    | % |  c | 1     | 3     | 2009-01-03 01:01:32 |
    | ^ |  d | 2     | 3     | 2009-01-03 01:04:32 |
    | & |  e | 3     | 3     | 2009-01-03 01:02:32 |
    | * |  f | 1     | 2     | 2009-01-05 01:01:32 |

What's going on is that another process (not under my control) is receiving data packets, and storing them directly into the database with a timestamp for arrival time. The packets are supposed to arrive in a burst... a,b will arrive near each other and are indexed 1 and 2, each packet containing the "total" number of packets transmitted. key is a normal auto-incremented primary key.

What i need is a view which will display the most recent list that has arrived (partial list, if not all of the packets have arrived, is acceptable).

For the above query, the result should ideally only be "f", but I'm not seeing a way to do that. If we can't get it another way, returning "a" and "f" would be acceptable. In other words, a small amount of extra data being caught by the select statement isn't huge issue. For the period of time prior to "f"s arrival, the correct return is c,d and e.

My general thoughts have been along the lines of:

SELECT * FROM table WHERE total = (
    SELECT total FROM table WHERE timestamp = (
        SELECT MAX(timetamp) FROM table
    )
)
ORDER BY DESC timestamp
LIMIT (
    SELECT total FROM table WHERE timestamp = (
        SELECT MAX(timetamp) FROM table
)

As some of you have probably noticed, you can't do a subquery in the LIMIT clause (at least with mysql). Does anyone have another approach to solving this problem? The query above could be made much cleaner by nesting a JOIN to a small list of recent id's, but that still leaves the LIMIT-subquery issue in the subquery.

As a two stage query, this is relatively trivial. The problem is that it needs to become the defining select statement for a VIEW.

Edit to fix wrong sql example

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Can you try to clearly explain what constitutes "most recent"? Since you're saying that "F" and "A" would be acceptable it doesn't look like it's straight timestamp. –  Tom H. Mar 4 '09 at 21:16
    
I was assuming an approach where you would guarantee unique "index" values, ensuring that you don't return more than "total" rows. Basically saying that although it is critical for "f" to be returned, returning "a" as well would not be a fatal flaw. –  user73917 Mar 4 '09 at 21:29
    
It is a shame that there is no identifier for each collection, if you have a collection span across 2 days, or two collections overlap, you're going to have trouble. –  Adam Mar 4 '09 at 21:58
    
since index's are assigned in order, you can use the answer I did below. –  sfossen Mar 4 '09 at 22:09
    
... or the one I did below, either one should work. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Mar 5 '09 at 12:14
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4 Answers

query I'm suggesting:

SELECT *
FROM packets
WHERE total = ( SELECT total
				FROM packets
				WHERE timestamp = ( SELECT MAX(timestamp) FROM packets ))
	AND timestamp >= ( SELECT MAX(timestamp) FROM packets WHERE idx = 1 )
ORDER BY timestamp DESC;

Inaction:

mysql> create table packets( id bigint(20) AUTO_INCREMENT primary key, data char(1), idx int(10), total int(10), timestamp datetime );
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> insert into packets( data, idx, total, timestamp ) values( 'a', 1 ,2,'2009-01-02 01:01:32'),
    ->     ('b' ,2 ,2,'2009-01-02 01:03:32'),
    ->     ('c'  ,1 ,3,'2009-01-03 01:01:32'),
    ->     ('d'  ,2 ,3,'2009-01-03 01:04:32'),
    ->     ('e' ,3 ,3,'2009-01-03 01:02:32'),
    ->     ('f' ,1 ,2,'2009-01-05 01:01:32');
Query OK, 6 rows affected (0.00 sec)
Records: 6  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql> SELECT *
    -> FROM packets
    -> WHERE total = ( SELECT total
    -> FROM packets
    -> WHERE timestamp = ( SELECT MAX(timestamp) FROM packets ))
    -> AND timestamp >= ( SELECT MAX(timestamp) FROM packets WHERE idx = 1 )
    -> ORDER BY timestamp DESC;
+----+------+------+-------+---------------------+
| id | data | idx  | total | timestamp           |
+----+------+------+-------+---------------------+
|  6 | f    |    1 |     2 | 2009-01-05 01:01:32 |
+----+------+------+-------+---------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> delete from packets where id = 6;
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> SELECT * FROM packets WHERE total = ( SELECT total FROM packets WHERE timestamp = ( SELECT MAX(timestamp) FROM packets )) AND timestamp >= ( SELECT MAX(timestamp) FROM packets WHERE idx = 1 ) ORDER BY timestamp DESC;
+----+------+------+-------+---------------------+
| id | data | idx  | total | timestamp           |
+----+------+------+-------+---------------------+
|  4 | d    |    2 |     3 | 2009-01-03 01:04:32 |
|  5 | e    |    3 |     3 | 2009-01-03 01:02:32 |
|  3 | c    |    1 |     3 | 2009-01-03 01:01:32 |
+----+------+------+-------+---------------------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql>
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No... but I can see why the question was confusing... Edited to add "For the period of time prior to "f"s arrival, the correct return is c,d and e." –  user73917 Mar 4 '09 at 21:16
    
I updated the query –  sfossen Mar 4 '09 at 21:19
    
note that, prior to f's arrival, that will only return "d", because only d's timestamp will match. (the packets do not arrive either in order, or all at once) –  user73917 Mar 4 '09 at 21:21
    
ok.. so I'm thinking if they arrive in order, grab the highest index 1 for you're lowerbound on time and the total for the packet sequence. –  sfossen Mar 4 '09 at 21:35
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This is how I'd do it in sql server, you can convert to mysql syntax.

SELECT *
FROM table
     INNER JOIN (SELECT TOP 1 * FROM table ORDER BY key DESC) AS t ON (table.timestamp = t.timestamp AND table.total = t.total)
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If they arrive in order without other packets being written in between, following should also work.

SELECT *
FROM Total t
     INNER JOIN (
       SELECT Total, Timestamp
       FROM Total t
            INNER JOIN (
              SELECT Timestamp = MAX(Timestamp) 
              FROM Total
              WHERE ID = 1
            ) ts ON ts.Timestamp = t.Timestamp.
     ) tit ON tit.Total = t.Total AND tit.Timestamp <= t.Timestamp
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I may end up going with an approach like this. Unhappily enough, occasionally these timestamps can be off each other by several hours. For the curious, this is remote sensing science data using a very intermittent pipe. –  user73917 Mar 4 '09 at 21:31
    
@kiruwa, if that is the case, you can't reliably construct a query to get all the data from the last transmission. If two transmissions with identical totals arrive with several hours interval between it's packets, <irony on>you're doomed... doomed I say <irony off> –  Lieven Keersmaekers Mar 4 '09 at 21:35
    
Yeah, the attempt was just to get something close. The equivalent of the two-stage query: foo = SELECT total FROM table WHERE timestamp = (SELECT MAX(timestamp)...) SELECT * FROM table WHERE total=$foo ORDER BY DESC timestamp LIMIT foo –  user73917 Mar 4 '09 at 22:07
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I ended up going with a slightly different query form:

CREATE VIEW NewestTimestamps AS
  SELECT index, MAX(timestamp) AS maxTS FROM table GROUP BY index;

CREATE VIEW NewestList AS
  SELECT * FROM table AS t
    JOIN NewestTimestamps sub ON t.timestamp = sub.maxTS AND sub.index = t.index
  WHERE t.total = (SELECT t2.total FROM table AS t2 
    WHERE timestamp = (SELECT MAX(timestamp) FROM table)
  ); 

This list is not precisely what I asked for, but it seems actually impossible to distinguish newer and older data reliably. Instead, this will give me the newest element at index 1, then index 2, etc... Additionally, the WHERE clause will limit the size of the view to the size of the most recently arrived queue.

Note that the first view is required since mysql does not allow subqueries in the FROM clause in a view.

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