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I am creating a new table by copying an existing table structure:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `PeopleView` LIKE `People`

I then want to change the data type of all fields using a wild card:

ALTER TABLE `PeopleView` CHANGE * * VARCHAR(3) NOT NULL

Any ideas how to do this?

I can do something like:

ALTER TABLE `PeopleView` CHANGE `FirstName` `FirstName` VARCHAR(3) NOT NULL

But I need a function I can run on many different tables where the field names are all different.

Purpose: Create another table that holds values that are used to decide which columns will be shown or hidden.

PHP Solution:

mysql_query("CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `PeopleView` LIKE `People`");

$cols = mysql_query("SHOW COLUMNS FROM `PeopleView`");

$sql = "ALTER TABLE `PeopleView` ";
while($row = mysql_fetch_assoc($cols)) {
  $sql .= "MODIFY `". $row['Field'] ."` VARCHAR(3) NOT NULL, ";
}
$sql = substr($sql, 0, -2);
mysql_query($sql);

I don't like that I have to run 3 queries to the database, surely there is a better way?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I then want to change the data type of all fields using a wild card:

You cannot do so. The syntax will only allow you to change the field types by enumerating them and their new definition, one by one.

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Is there a way to generate them automatically within the statement? –  Craig May 25 '11 at 12:17
    
You could get the list of columns from the information_schema and use those to generate the needed statements. –  Denis May 25 '11 at 12:20
    
Ok so generate the list first and then create the statement? I'm using PHP I guess I can run a query to return an array of column names. How do I then format the ALTER TABLE statement? e.g. ALTER TABLE PeopleView CHANGE FirstName FirstName VARCHAR(3) NOT NULL, LastName LastName VARCHAR(3) NOT NULL is that correct? –  Craig May 25 '11 at 12:24
    
Basically yeah. And execute them one by one. (Though, note that you can alter multiple columns in the same statement: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/alter-table.html) –  Denis May 25 '11 at 12:26
    
Ok cheers, I'll give this a go and report back here –  Craig May 25 '11 at 12:31

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