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I am very curious about this thing

Int32

int addmonths_int = 10;
DateTime.Now.AddMonths(addmonths_int);

Int16

short addmonths_short = 10;
DateTime.Now.AddMonths(addmonths_short);

If we could give Int16 as Parameter in the AddMonths function and also the month's value can never be more than 12 then why do .NET Framework uses the month as Int32 and not Int16...

If is there any culture specific problem in declaring the month as Int16... !!??!!

I am here thinking that if month would have been Int16 then it would saved some bit of length in some where .. i think Memory Allocation

UPDATE

what would be the suggestion for DateTime.Now.Month property couldn't it be Int16 instead of Int32 ??

IS IT ALL ONE AND THE SAME ??

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@all also this SO question might be throw some hightlight on the topic stackoverflow.com/questions/270263/… –  Harsh Baid May 25 '11 at 13:09
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You can add 18 months onto a date, so an upper limit of 12 makes no sense (and if it did, Byte would be more appropriate than Int16) –  Damien_The_Unbeliever May 25 '11 at 13:12
    
@all ok i aggree with the @philippe-leybaert's and jason's concept but what would be the suggestion for DateTime.Now.Month property couldn't it be Int16 instead of Int32 ?? –  Harsh Baid May 25 '11 at 13:16
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Again, if we were micro-optimizing, why would we stop at Int16 when Byte is available? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever May 25 '11 at 13:18
    
@damien-the-unbeliever True –  Harsh Baid May 25 '11 at 13:20
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4 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

First of all, it can be more than 12 months. Nothing stops you from calculating the date plus 435345 months.

As for the Int32 choice: Int32 is the native integer data type of 32 bit systems, so it is the most efficient data type to work with.

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+1. Why waste 16 bits (in the case of an Int16), or 24 bits (in the case of a Byte)? Further, the assumption that you can't add more than 12 to a month is incorrect. The valid number of months might be limited to 12 (and then only if it's one-based), but you can add a large number of months to a date to calculate a new date. –  Mike Hofer May 25 '11 at 13:25
    
@Mike: I don't understand what you mean by "wastage". Where precisely is the memory being wasted? The argument will almost certainly be enregistered, and the register is at least 32 bits wide on modern hardware. Do you really want to generate extra code that deals with ensuring that a 32 bit register never has a number bigger than a 16 bit integer in it? How much extra code are you willing to generate to ensure that those top 16 bits are always zero? –  Eric Lippert May 25 '11 at 16:59
    
@Eric, I think we're violently agreeing, actually. Though I will gladly admit to your vastly superior knowledge of CLR and compiler internals--I'm just an armchair theorist, and my knowledge of how this stuff works is paltry at best. My point was that you'd use 32 bits in any case, and trying to conserve memory by allocating a smaller data type was largely pointless, especially since the assumption regarding the method's contract was incorrect. –  Mike Hofer May 25 '11 at 20:42
    
@Mike: Ah, yes, then we are in violent agreement. I misunderstood the thrust of your argument. My bad! –  Eric Lippert May 25 '11 at 20:52
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If we could give Int16 as Parameter in the AddMonths function and also the month's value can never be more than 12 then why do .NET Framework uses the month as Int32 and not Int16...

Why can't you add thirteen months to today and end up with June 25, 2012?

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This answer is not time invariant. :) –  Julien Lebosquain May 25 '11 at 13:14
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Your assumption is incorrect:

also the month's value can never be more than 12

Even if you were correct, I don't think it would have bought you much using a 16-bit integer instead of a 32-bit one: probably the size of a DateTime object wouldn't change at all.

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You can add more than 12 months to a given date using the AddMonths function.

The actual restriction is as follows though;

Months value must be between +/-120000

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