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I'm trying to write a test for the following method:

 public class Sort {

...
...
...

    public static String[][] findRanks(String[][] array, int indexOfPoints, int indexOfRank) {

        for (int i = 0; i < array.length - 1; i++) { 
            int compare = 1;
            if (i < array.length - 2)
                compare = Double.valueOf(array[i][indexOfPoints]).compareTo(Double.valueOf(array[i + 1][indexOfPoints]));

            if (i == array.length - 1 || compare != 0) { 
                array[i][indexOfRank] = Integer.toString(i + 1);
            }
            else {
                array[i][indexOfRank] = Integer.toString(i + 1) + " - " + Integer.toString(i + 2);
                array[i+1][indexOfRank] = Integer.toString(i + 1) + " - " + Integer.toString(i + 2);
                i++;
            }
        }
        return array;   
    }

}

I've tryed the following test:

import static org.junit.Assert.*;
import junit.framework.TestCase;
import org.junit.Test;

public class SortTest extends TestCase {

    @Test
    public void testFindRanks() {
        String[][] array = { {"Siim Susi","12.61","5.00","9.22","1.50","60.39","16.43","21.60","2.60","35.81","5.25.72","6253.0","1"}, 
                {"Beata Kana","13.04","4.53","7.79","1.55","64.72","18.74","24.20","2.40","28.20","6.50.76","5290.0","2"}};

        Sort test1 = new Sort(array, 11, 12); //This is where the problem is

        String[][] expected = { {"Siim Susi","12.61","5.00","9.22","1.50","60.39","16.43","21.60","2.60","35.81","5.25.72","6253.0","1"}, 
                                {"Beata Kana","13.04","4.53","7.79","1.55","64.72","18.74","24.20","2.40","28.20","6.50.76","5290.0","2"}};

        assertTrue(expected.equals(test1));
        fail("Not yet implemented");
    }

}

But the test keeps telling me "the constructor Sort(String[][], 11, 12);" is undefined. Why does it think it has to be a constructor and how do i fix this?

Thank you.

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should write

    String[][] results = Sort.findRanks(array, 11, 12);

and to make your unit tests cleaner, more idiomatic and easier to maintain, you could also refactor it a bit:

public class SortTest extends TestCase {

    @Test
    public void testFindRanks() {
        String[][] array = {...};
        String[][] expected = {...};

        String[][] result = Sort.findRanks(array, 11, 12);

        assertArrayEquals(expected, result);
    }
}

That is, separate the test setup, the call to the tested method, and the verification code. Also remove the fail call from the end, as it will make your test always fail :-)

share|improve this answer
1  
findRanks is static :-) – Sean Patrick Floyd May 25 '11 at 13:19
    
Although you can call static methods on an instance, it is frowned upon... – nicholas.hauschild May 25 '11 at 13:21
    
@Sean, @nicholas, oops, fixed :-) – Péter Török May 25 '11 at 13:23
    
Thanks a lot, this worked like a charm. :) – Kristjan May 25 '11 at 13:27

Looks like you need to do

 String[][] actual = Sort.findRanks(array, 11, 12);

and then

assertArrayEquals(expected, actual);
share|improve this answer
    
findRanks(...) is static, and although this will work, it is not the preferred syntax. – nicholas.hauschild May 25 '11 at 13:21
    
@nicholas I did notice it after I answered and I have revised my answer. Thanks. – Bala R May 25 '11 at 13:22

This is a constructor call:

new Sort(array, 11, 12)

And the compiler complains if no such constructor is available

Read about Constructors in the Java tutorial

share|improve this answer

The message is exactly correct: Your Sort class doesn't define a constructor that takes String[][], int, int as parameters, which you are calling on the line that has the problem.

You need:

String[][] actual = Sort.findRanks(array, 11, 12);
share|improve this answer

Well, it does not look like you have a Sort constructor defined (at least in the code you posted). And the compiler/IDE is telling you that you do not have a Sort constructor defined.

You probably mean to be calling this line:

String[][] value = Sort.findRanks(array, 11, 12);
//Sort test1 = new Sort(array, 11, 12); <-- dont call this...call the above...
share|improve this answer

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