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How well supported is navigator.cookieEnabled? Can I safely rely on it for all browsers?

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possible duplicate of How to detect that JavaScript and/or Cookies are disabled ? –  epascarello May 25 '11 at 13:42
2  
@epascarello I don't think so. I'm aware of the concept of trying a cookie just to see if it works, but I wanted to see how reliable cookieEnabled is. For the application I'm working on, the smaller I can keep the code, the better. –  dtbarne May 25 '11 at 14:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

I know it's supported in at least IE 6 and later, Firefox 1 and later, and Dottoro reports that it is supported by all major browsers.

However, it is not part of any DOM specification and therefore is not guaranteed to be available on all browsers (for instance, mobile browsers with limited DOM implementations).

For a complete cross browser solution, you might want to go with something like this:

var cookies = navigator.cookieEnabled ||
        ("cookie" in document && (document.cookie.length > 0 ||
        (document.cookie = "test").indexOf.call(document.cookie, "test") > -1));

This will return false in browsers that have cookies disabled or don't support the DOM level 2 property document.cookie, which is about as far as you can go in JS.

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FWIW, I'm just using navigator.cookieEnabled. –  dtbarne Aug 19 '11 at 1:59
    
@dtbarne: yeah, like I said cookieEnabled isn't part of the spec, so the code in my answer is just for the super-paranoid :-) –  Andy E Aug 19 '11 at 10:19
    
Hi Andy, can you please explain the 2nd and 3rd clauses of the conditional? –  Cupidvogel Dec 17 '12 at 19:32
    
@Cupidvogel: Actually, there's only two clauses of the conditional. My code formatting kind of disguises it because I'm a little obsessive when it comes to small code blocks displaying horizontal scrollbars. (document.cookie.length > 0 || (document.cookie = "test").indexOf.call(document.cookie, "test") > -1) is a separate statement which, 1) checks a cookie property exists and then asserts that 2a) its length non-zero (a cookie already exists); or 2b) we can set a cookie and then verify that it was set. –  Andy E Dec 18 '12 at 22:43
    
Yeah, but don't you think that the call is redundant? I mean, you can achieve the same by just (document.cookie = "test").indexOf ("test") > -1), since we are not passing in a different object, right? –  Cupidvogel Dec 19 '12 at 5:02

In a quick test just now (using IE9), it appears that navigator.cookieEnabled still returns true when the browser is blocking cookies for that site.

In other words, cookies are enabled but not for that particular page you are on.

Therefore you need to test for whether cookies actually work when you set them. The correct code should be (modified from Andy E's answer):

var cookies = 
    ("cookie" in document && (document.cookie.length > 0 ||
    (document.cookie = "test").indexOf.call(document.cookie, "test") > -1))

There is really no point in checking navigator.cookieEnabled.

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+1. It's true. If you read nothing else, read this: There is really no point in checking navigator.cookieEnabled. –  dtbarne Mar 25 '13 at 14:41

I like this 1 liner function:

function cookiesEnabled() {
    return $.cookie('check', 'valid', { expires: 1 }) && $.cookie('check') == 'valid';
}
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That's only a one liner if you have jQuery already, otherwise it's 1 line + 100KB. :) –  dtbarne Jul 30 at 22:45
    
LOL, roger your right. I think with AJAX being the future, jquery will eventually be the norm. Can you think of any problems cross-compatibility wise with my solution? Thanks –  scuzzlebuzzle Jul 31 at 16:08
    
Nope, looks solid. –  dtbarne Aug 4 at 1:32

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