Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I seem to be confident that the following 2 statements are the same

List<object> values = new List<object>();
values.ForEach(value => System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(value.ToString()));

AND

List<object> values = new List<object>();
values.ForEach((object value) => { 
    System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(value.ToString());
});

AND I know I can insert multiple lines of code in the second example like

List<object> values = new List<object>();
values.ForEach((object value) => { 
    System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(value.ToString());
    System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("Some other action");
});

BUT can you do the same thing in the first example? I can't seem to work out a way.

share|improve this question
    
If C# had the comma operator like in C or C++ then that could have been used to avoid the brackets. However, C# does not have the comma operator (except as an exception in for-loops). But C# does not have this operator, so it is somewhat irrelevant. –  Ole Tolshave May 25 '11 at 13:57
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Yes you can :)

        List<object> values = new List<object>();
        values.ForEach(value =>
                           {
                               System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(value.ToString());
                               System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("Some other action");
                           }

            );
share|improve this answer
add comment

This works fine:

values.ForEach(value =>
        { System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(value.ToString()); }
);

Maybe you forgot the ;

share|improve this answer
    
...or forgot the {} –  Jemes May 25 '11 at 13:47
1  
+1: I also figured the OP would have forgotten the ;. Lolz at @o6tech who apparently doesn't read the questions too well –  sehe May 25 '11 at 13:49
    
... apparently I don't. +1 to you :) –  Jemes May 25 '11 at 13:51
    
Well, after reading again, I still think my comment was valid. His first example (which he wanted to add multiple statements to), didn't include {}'s, so it's possible he was omitting them, no? –  Jemes May 25 '11 at 13:54
add comment

The only real difference between the first and the second is the { }. Add that to the first one and you can then add as many lines as you want. It isn't the (object value) that is allowing you to add multiple lines.

share|improve this answer
add comment

As others have shown, you can use a statement lambda (with braces) to do this:

parameter-list => { statements; }

However, it's worth noting that this has a restriction: you can't convert a statement lambda into an expression tree, only a delegate. So for example, this works:

Func<int> x = () => { return 5; };

But this doesn't:

Expression<Func<int>> y = () => { return 5; };
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.