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I would like to average across "Rows" in a column. That is rows that have the same value in another column.

For example :

e= {{1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2}, 
   {69, 7, 30, 38, 16, 70, 97, 50, 97, 31, 81, 96, 60, 52, 35, 6, 
    24, 65, 76, 100}}

enter image description here

I would like to average all the Value in the second column that have the same value in the first one.

So Here : The Average for Col 1 = 1 & Col 1 = 2

And then create a third column with the result of this operation. So the values in that columns should be the same for the first 10 lines an next 10.

Many Thanks for any help you could provide !

LA

Output Ideal Format :

enter image description here

share|improve this question
    
I believe you have an error in your code: d[[10 ;; 20]] should be d[[11 ;; 20]] –  Mr.Wizard May 25 '11 at 15:02
    
Thank You ! I am sorry, i must do sthing wrong but none of yours or Belisarius Proposition produce the same output as above :( –  500 May 25 '11 at 15:15
    
Just to be sure, you are not regenerating the random numbers between trials, are you? –  Mr.Wizard May 25 '11 at 15:24
    
@Mr. Wizard : Sorry did not see this last Comment. I copied all the comments & code I needed, You can remove anything you think is not necessary. Thank You again ! –  500 May 26 '11 at 13:32
    
You're welcome, again. ;-) –  Mr.Wizard May 26 '11 at 13:36

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Interesting problem. This is the first thing that came into my mind:

e[[All, {1}]] /. Reap[Sow[#2, #] & @@@ e, _, # -> Mean@#2 &][[2]];

ArrayFlatten[{{e, %}}] // TableForm

To get rounding you may simply add Round@ before Mean in the code above: Round@Mean@#2

Here is a slightly faster method, but I actually prefer the Sow/Reap one above:

#[[1, 1]] -> Round@Mean@#[[All, 2]] & /@ GatherBy[e, First];

ArrayFlatten[{{e, e[[All, {1}]] /. %}}] // TableForm

If you have many different elements in the first column, either of the solutions above can be made faster by applying Dispatch to the rule list that is produced, before the replacement (/.) is done. This command tells Mathematica to build and use an optimized internal format for the rules list.

Here is a variant that is slower, but I like it enough to share anyway:

Module[{q},
  Reap[{#, Sow[#2,#], q@#} & @@@ e, _, (q@# = Mean@#2) &][[1]]
]

Also, general tips, you can replace:

Table[RandomInteger[{1, 100}], {20}] with RandomInteger[{1, 100}, 20]

and Join[{c}, {d}] // Transpose with Transpose[{c, d}].

share|improve this answer
    
@500, if you need to clarify your question, edit it, rather than posting examples in the comments. –  Mr.Wizard May 25 '11 at 14:44
    
Should this be self-explaining? Tried it and it works. Compact code. But I don't really get it. - Think when coding on the poor soul that has to maintain it, one day. –  ndroock1 May 26 '11 at 8:27
    
@ndroock1 I admit to writing opaque code, but it's not really complicated. In fact, it's pretty straight forward, once you're familiar with Sow and Reap. Basically, Sow[x, t] stores item x in a bin called t, then Reap gathers all the bins, and (with a third argument) does something with each one of them. In my first method, that something is # -> Mean@#2 & which breaks down as make a rule for # (the tag name) into Mean@#2 (the mean of the contents of the bin). After that, it's just applying this rule to a copy of the first column, and appending it to the table. –  Mr.Wizard May 26 '11 at 9:40
    
Thanks, @Mr.Wizard, that helped. –  ndroock1 May 26 '11 at 10:00
    
@Mr.Wizzard : I am struggling to adapt your first code above on a bigger table : How can I make it to compute the average of the 5thcolumns values on a range of it based on the second column for example ? As of now it is the second based on the first column. I get the Snow[5#,#] for the column on which the average must be computed but can`t find how to modify the column number on wish the range is to be defined. I hope this is clear. Thanks in advance for your attention. –  500 May 26 '11 at 22:53

What the heck, I'll join the party. Here is my version:

Flatten/@Flatten[Thread/@Transpose@{#,Mean/@#[[All,All,2]]}&@GatherBy[e,First],1]

Should be fast enough I guess.

EDIT

In response to the critique of @Mr.Wizard (my first solution was reordering the list), and to explore a bit the high-performance corner of the problem, here are 2 alternative solutions:

getMeans[e_] := 
Module[{temp = ConstantArray[0, Max[#[[All, 1, 1]]]]},
  temp[[#[[All, 1, 1]]]] = Mean /@ #[[All, All, 2]];
  List /@ temp[[e[[All, 1]]]]] &[GatherBy[e, First]];

getMeansSparse[e_] := 
Module[{temp = SparseArray[{Max[#[[All, 1, 1]]] -> 0}]},
  temp[[#[[All, 1, 1]]]] = Mean /@ #[[All, All, 2]];
  List /@ Normal@temp[[e[[All, 1]]]]] &[GatherBy[e, First]];

The first one is the fastest, trading memory for speed, and can be applied when keys are all integers, and your maximal "key" value (2 in your example) is not too large. The second solution is free from the latter limitation, but is slower. Here is a large list of pairs:

In[303]:= 
tst = RandomSample[#, Length[#]] &@
   Flatten[Map[Thread[{#, RandomInteger[{1, 100}, 300]}] &, 
      RandomSample[Range[1000], 500]], 1];

In[310]:= Length[tst]

Out[310]= 150000

In[311]:= tst[[;; 10]]

Out[311]= {{947, 52}, {597, 81}, {508, 20}, {891, 81}, {414, 47}, 
{849, 45}, {659, 69}, {841, 29}, {700, 98}, {858, 35}}

The keys can be from 1 to 1000 here, 500 of them, and there are 300 random numbers for each key. Now, some benchmarks:

In[314]:= (res0 = getMeans[tst]); // Timing

Out[314]= {0.109, Null}

In[317]:= (res1 = getMeansSparse[tst]); // Timing

Out[317]= {0.219, Null}

In[318]:= (res2 =  tst[[All, {1}]] /. 
 Reap[Sow[#2, #] & @@@ tst, _, # -> Mean@#2 &][[2]]); // Timing

Out[318]= {5.687, Null}

In[319]:= (res3 = tst[[All, {1}]] /. 
 Dispatch[
  Reap[Sow[#2, #] & @@@ tst, _, # -> Mean@#2 &][[2]]]); // Timing

Out[319]= {0.391, Null}

In[320]:= res0 === res1 === res2 === res3

Out[320]= True

We can see that the getMeans is the fastest here, getMeansSparse the second fastest, and the solution of @Mr.Wizard is somewhat slower, but only when we use Dispatch, otherwise it is much slower. Mine and @Mr.Wizard's solutions (with Dispatch) are similar in spirit, the speed difference is due to (sparse) array indexing being more efficient than hash look-up. Of course, all this matters only when your list is really large.

EDIT 2

Here is a version of getMeans which uses Compile with a C target and returns numerical values (rather than rationals). It is about twice faster than getMeans, and the fastest of my solutions.

getMeansComp = 
 Compile[{{e, _Integer, 2}},
   Module[{keys = e[[All, 1]], values = e[[All, 2]], sums = {0.} ,
      lengths = {0}, , i = 1, means = {0.} , max = 0, key = -1 , 
      len = Length[e]},
    max = Max[keys];
    sums = Table[0., {max}];
    lengths = Table[0, {max}];
    means = sums;
    Do[key = keys[[i]];
      sums[[key]] += values[[i]];
      lengths[[key]]++, {i, len}];
    means = sums/(lengths + (1 - Unitize[lengths]));
    means[[keys]]], CompilationTarget -> "C", RuntimeOptions -> "Speed"]

getMeansC[e_] := List /@ getMeansComp[e];

The code 1 - Unitize[lengths] protects against division by zero for unused keys. We need every number in a separate sublist, so we should call getMeansC, not getMeansComp directly. Here are some measurements:

In[180]:= (res1 = getMeans[tst]); // Timing

Out[180]= {0.11, Null}

In[181]:= (res2 = getMeansC[tst]); // Timing

Out[181]= {0.062, Null}

In[182]:= N@res1 == res2

Out[182]= True

This can probably be considered a heavily optimized numerical solution. The fact that the fully general, brief and beautiful solution of @Mr.Wizard is only about 6-8 times slower speaks very well for the latter general concise solution, so, unless you want to squeeze every microsecond out of it, I'd stick with @Mr.Wizard's one (with Dispatch). But it's important to know how to optimize code, and also to what degree it can be optimized (what can you expect).

share|improve this answer
    
Your code reorders the list. Perhaps that is not a problem, but I avoided it. –  Mr.Wizard May 25 '11 at 15:22
    
@Mr.Wizard True. Your method is very cool, but I'd additionally wrap the rules in Dispatch, or its performance will degrade with a (very) large number of different "keys". –  Leonid Shifrin May 25 '11 at 15:28
    
I was concerned my code was already complicated enough, but that is certainly a valid point. –  Mr.Wizard May 25 '11 at 15:31
    
By the way, I take "very cool" coming from you as a high complement. –  Mr.Wizard May 25 '11 at 15:33
1  
@500 Ok, great. I used your initial definition of e. You apparently transposed it further down the page. –  Leonid Shifrin May 25 '11 at 16:21

A naive approach could be:

Table[
  Join[ i, {Select[Mean /@ SplitBy[e, First], First@# == First@i &][[1, 2]]}]
, {i, e}] // TableForm

(*
1   59  297/5
1   72  297/5
1   90  297/5
1   63  297/5
1   77  297/5
1   98  297/5
1   3   297/5
1   99  297/5
1   28  297/5
1   5   297/5
2   87  127/2
2   80  127/2
2   29  127/2
2   70  127/2
2   83  127/2
2   75  127/2
2   68  127/2
2   65  127/2
2   1   127/2
2   77  127/2
*)

You could also create your original list by using for example:

e = Array[{Ceiling[#/10], RandomInteger[{1, 100}]} &, {20}]

Edit

Answering @Mr.'s comments

If the list is not sorted by its first element, you can do:

Table[Join[
  i, {Select[
     Mean /@ SplitBy[SortBy[e, First], First], First@# == First@i &][[1,2]]}],
{i, e}] //TableForm

But this is not necessary in your example

share|improve this answer
    
You beat me by seconds! :-) –  Mr.Wizard May 25 '11 at 14:23
    
You guys are spectacular. I am new to Mathematica, and your help is really precious ! –  500 May 25 '11 at 14:37
    
belisarius, I am getting funny results using your code. Let e = {{3, 77}, {3, 34}, {1, 57}, {2, 90}, {2, 21}, {2, 36}, {1, 34}} then the mean for type 1 should be (57 + 34)/2 not 57. –  Mr.Wizard May 25 '11 at 14:42
    
@Mr. It assumes an ordered list (by its first element) as input –  belisarius May 25 '11 at 14:44
    
I do not see that in the specification. –  Mr.Wizard May 25 '11 at 14:46

Why not pile on?

I thought this was the most straightforward/easy-to-read answer, though not necessarily the fastest. But it's really amazing how many ways you can think of a problem like this in Mathematica.

Mr. Wizard's is obviously very cool as others have pointed out.

@Nasser, your solution doesn't generalize to n-classes, although it easily could be modified to do so.

meanbygroup[table_] := Join @@ Table[
   Module[
     {sublistmean},
     sublistmean = Mean[sublist[[All, 2]]];
     Table[Append[item, sublistmean], {item, sublist}]
   ]
   , {sublist, GatherBy[table, #[[1]] &]}
       ]
(* On this dataset: *) 
meanbygroup[e] 
share|improve this answer

Wow, the answers here are so advanced and cool looking, Need more time to learn them.

Here is my answer, I am still matrix/vector/Matlab'ish guy in recovery and transition, so my solution is not functional like the experts solution here, I look at data as matrices and vectors (easier for me than looking at them as lists of lists etc...) so here it is


sizeOfList=10; (*given from the problem, along with e vector*)
m1 = Mean[e[[1;;sizeOfList,2]]];
m2 = Mean[e[[sizeOfList+1;;2 sizeOfList,2]]];
r  = {Flatten[{a,b}], d , Flatten[{Table[m1,{sizeOfList}],Table[m2,{sizeOfList}]}]} //Transpose;

MatrixForm[r]

Clearly not as a good a solution as the functional ones.

Ok, I will go now and hide away from the functional programmers :)

--Nasser

share|improve this answer
    
your contribution is appreciated –  Mr.Wizard May 25 '11 at 15:54
    
We wish you good luck on your recovery/transition. It's worth the effort, I assure you. Just don't hesitate to ask for help posting questions as you make progress –  belisarius May 25 '11 at 17:04

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