Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hi
I have a small batch file on windows that starts excel with some addins and it works properly when i double click on the file . When i try to start the batch file from python subprocess.Popen then it throw an exception saying that he can't find some addin.
Does anyone know where to start looking at to spot the issue (security rights, environment)?

Here is an example of the code i have that already exhibit the pb:

import subprocess
import os

local_env = os.environ.copy()
subprocess.Popen(r'C:\WINNT\system32\cmd.exe', env=local_env)

If i execute this script i will work and i will end up with a cmd shell. The pb is that from this shell starting my scripts don't work. If i remove the env=local_env from the Popen it is then working. Any idea what is wrong with this code?

Thx

share|improve this question
2  
Let us see what you've written and any traceback it throws. –  tMC May 25 '11 at 14:19
    
@Dave: "Does anyone know where to start looking at to spot the issue (security rights, environment)?". Yes. The actual error from the actual traceback is a start. It's entirely a matter of the environment: the working directory and the PYTHONPATH. Printing sys.path is often informative so you can see the differences between the environment at the double-click and the environment created by subprocess.Popen. Also, print os.environ can be helpful. –  S.Lott May 25 '11 at 15:25
    
@S.Lott: The issue is that once this process is started I am not anymore in a python environment. I do have test the environment variable and they match with if i had started cmd.exe directly. The pb is really related to passing an environment dictionay . –  Dave May 25 '11 at 16:56
    
@Dave: "Printing sys.path is often informative so you can see the differences between the environment at the double-click and the environment created by subprocess.Popen. Also, print os.environ can be helpful" You can add print statements in a lot of places to collect this information. In the "not anymore in python environment" doesn't mean much, since you're running Python programs which can use print statements to display environmental information. –  S.Lott May 25 '11 at 17:09
1  
@Dave: Agreed. Facts are better than assumptions. Please help by gathering facts. Please print os.environ and sys.path to prove what exactly is in the environment both times. The code isn't enough information, since your OS contains numerous additional environment setting information. You need to (1) what is different between your two scenarios before you can figure out (2) why it is different. In order figure out (1) What, you need to dump and collect all the relevant data. And include it in the question. –  S.Lott May 26 '11 at 10:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.