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I would like to use numpy.frompyfunc to generate an unbound ufunc from an unbound member method. My concrete but failing attempts look like

class Foo(object):
    def f(x,y,z):
        return x + y + z

Foo.g = numpy.frompyfunc(Foo.f,3,1)
i = Foo()
i.g(5,6,7)

where the last line fails with "TypeError: unbound method f() must be called with Foo instance as first argument (got int instance instead)". That error makes sense to me as Foo.f is unbound.

Despite it being deprecated, I thought I'd give new.instancemethod a shot:

import new
Foo.h = new.instancemethod(numpy.frompyfunc(Foo.f,3,1),None,Foo)
j = Foo()
j.h(5,6,7)

where the last line now fails with "TypeError: return arrays must be of ArrayType" which I don't understand.

My goal is to monkey patch Foo with ufunc-ready versions of its members. They must be member methods as they depend on a Foo instance's state (though that dependency is not shown here).

Any suggestions?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted
import numpy as np

class Foo(object):
    def f(self,x,y,z):
        return x + y + z

Add a g method to Foo:

def g(self,x,y,z):
    return np.frompyfunc(self.f,3,1)(x,y,z)
Foo.g = g

Calling g from an instance of Foo:

i = Foo()
print(i.g(np.array([5,6]),np.array([6,7]),np.array([7,8])))
# [18 21]
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent. Exactly what I needed. I've additionally added an 'out=None' parameter to g to match the usual ufunc usage. Thank you. –  Rhys Ulerich Jun 6 '11 at 13:51

I must admit that I don't quite understand why you'd want f and g to be inside Foo class, but the following works:

>>> class Foo(object):
...     @staticmethod
...     def f(x, y, z):
...             return x+y+z
...
>>> Foo.g = numpy.frompyfunc(Foo.f, 3, 1)
>>> i = Foo()
>>> i.g(5, 6, 7)
18

EDIT: since you want to use instance data in your method, what you actualy need is a bound method:

>>> class Foo(object):
...     def f(self, x, y, z):
...             return x+y+z
...
>>> i = Foo()
>>> i.g = numpy.frompyfunc(i.f, 3, 1)
>>> i.g(5, 6, 7)
18

Of course, in real code you will probably want to assign g in Foo.__init__ , not outside of the class:

>>> class Foo(object):
...     def __init__(self):
...             self.g = numpy.frompyfunc(self.f, 3, 1)
...     def f(self, x, y, z):
...             return x+y+z
...
>>> i = Foo()
>>> i.g(5, 6, 7)
18
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for looking into this. I'd like f and g inside Foo as in reality (i.e. outside of this cooked example) my Foo contains nontrivial member data used by f(x,y,z). The @staticmethod approach doesn't quite fit my needs as declaring f(x,y,z) static doesn't allow access to the data members. –  Rhys Ulerich May 25 '11 at 17:01
    
Oh, then you want a normal bound method. See above. –  Igor Nazarenko May 25 '11 at 22:01
    
Your use of __init__(self) as a way to generate a bound method makes perfect sense (thank you), but I'm afraid my use case doesn't allow me to access to __init__ as Foo is generated by SWIG (unless it's possible to add code to __init__ using the Foo class object). Also, subclassing Foo to get access to the subclass' __init__ won't work either as SWIG will be using Foo and not the subclass. –  Rhys Ulerich May 27 '11 at 14:05

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