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I know I can sort a list doing something like this

var result = List<T>.OrderBy(value => value.property);

But lets say I have something like this

    class Stock
    {
        public Guid ID { get; set; }
        public string Description { get; set; }
    }

    class StockList : List<Stock>
    {
        public enum SomeEnum
        {
            SomeOtherValue = 0,
            SomeOtherOtherValue
        }
        //What if I want method like this using LINQ?
        public void Sort(SomeEnum sortBy)
        {
            switch (sortBy) 
            {
                case SomeValue.SomeOtherOtherValue:
                    //Sort one way
                    break;
                case SomeValue.SomeOtherValue:
                    //Sort another
                    break;
            }
        }
    }

this.OrderBy() (and I assume the other LINQ extentions) return an OrderedCollection and doesn't seem to affect the original. So I assume I'm going about this the wrong way?

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Note that when you do List<T>.OrderBY(...) you aren't sorting the list, you're returning an enumerable that will enumerate over the list in order. i.e. the list isn't effected (as you've found). –  George Duckett May 25 '11 at 15:23
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use List.Sort( ). This will do an in-place sort of the list.

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You can do

this.Sort(new Comparison<Stock>((x,y) => x.Description.CompareTo(y.Description)));
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