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In C# 3.0 you can create anonymous class with the following syntax

var o = new { Id = 1, Name = "Foo" };

Is there a way to add these anonymous class to a generic list?

Example:

var o = new { Id = 1, Name = "Foo" };
var o1 = new { Id = 2, Name = "Bar" };

List<var> list = new List<var>();
list.Add(o);
list.Add(o1);

Another Example:

List<var> list = new List<var>();

while (....)
{
    ....
    list.Add(new {Id = x, Name = y});
    ....
}
share|improve this question
    
Note that all the objects must be typed the same in the array. Rarely you may need to help with a cast, especially for nulls new[] { new{ Id = (int?)null, Name = "Foo" }, new { Id = (int?)1, Name = "Foo" }} –  AaronLS May 24 '13 at 19:25

13 Answers 13

up vote 172 down vote accepted

You could do:

var list = new[] { o, o1 }.ToList();

There are lots of ways of skinning this cat, but basically they'll all use type inference somewhere - which means you've got to be calling a generic method (possibly as an extension method). Another example might be:

public static List<T> CreateList<T>(params T[] elements)
{
     return new List<T>(elements);
}

var list = CreateList(o, o1);

You get the idea :)

share|improve this answer
    
The correct syntax (at least in 3.5) is var list = new[] {o, o1}; –  DHornpout Mar 4 '09 at 22:43
17  
@DHornpout: That would give an array, not a List<T>. –  Jon Skeet Mar 4 '09 at 22:47
11  
@DHornpout: Do you have "using System.Linq;" at the top of your file? ToList is a LINQ operator. –  Jon Skeet Mar 4 '09 at 23:06
1  
(You also need a reference to System.Core of course.) –  Jon Skeet Mar 4 '09 at 23:06
3  
Got it.. Need to include "using System.Linq". Thanks. –  DHornpout Mar 4 '09 at 23:13

Here is the answer.

string result = String.Empty;

var list = new[]
{ 
    new { Number = 10, Name = "Smith" },
    new { Number = 10, Name = "John" } 
}.ToList();

foreach (var item in list)
{
    result += String.Format("Name={0}, Number={1}\n", item.Name, item.Number);
}

MessageBox.Show(result);
share|improve this answer
7  
Dutt, your code should work without the .ToList() at the end. –  DHornpout Nov 4 '09 at 1:26
1  
Thanks Dutt, this is exactly what I was looking for! –  longda May 5 '11 at 23:57
1  
okay cool, now we need an example of replacing the new {} lines with a select statement. var list = sourceList.Select( o => new { o.ModelId, o.PartNumber, o.Quantity }).ToList(); –  tote Jan 24 '13 at 16:37
    
@towpse any solution about it ? –  Kiquenet Mar 20 '13 at 8:39
    
@Dutt, any sample if I use a method (function) that returns a List<T> ? –  Kiquenet Mar 20 '13 at 8:41

Yes, you can say List<object> and things will work. However, list[0].Id won't work. This will work in C# 4.0 by having a List<dynamic>.

UPDATE: As mentioned in the comments, this List<dynamic> trick won't get you IntelliSense, but it will work at runtime.

share|improve this answer
    
It's not strongly-typed, though, in the sense that you'll have no compiler intellisense support for the items in the list. –  Joel Coehoorn Mar 4 '09 at 22:12
11  
This is the kind of things I fear people will do with dynamic. –  erikkallen Mar 5 '09 at 9:47
1  
I didn't say it was a great idea, but that it was possible :-) There could be a need if storing objects from Ruby for example. –  Jeff Moser Mar 5 '09 at 14:40
1  
But in those cases the source type is dynamic after all, it makes no sense to use a List<dynamic> for anonymous types. –  Dykam Oct 30 '09 at 9:13
    
Very helpful. Especially if the list has to be defined before anonymous items are added into it. –  user357320 Jul 8 at 11:25

I guess

List<T> CreateEmptyGenericList<T>(T example) {
    return new List<T>();
}

void something() {
    var o = new { Id = 1, Name = "foo" };
    var emptyListOfAnonymousType = CreateEmptyGenericList(o);
}

will work.

You might also consider writing it like this:

void something() {
    var String = string.Emtpy;
    var Integer = int.MinValue;
    var emptyListOfAnonymousType = CreateEmptyGenericList(new { Id = Integer, Name = String });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes this solution will help solve initialize the Anonymous array. Thanks. –  DHornpout Mar 4 '09 at 22:55
    
Just put a little <T> after the method name. –  Martin Dec 2 '11 at 14:16

You can do this in your code.

var list = new[] { new { Id = 1, Name = "Foo" } }.ToList();
list.Add(new { Id = 2, Name = "Bar" });
share|improve this answer

Here is my attempt.

List<object> list = new List<object> { new { Id = 10, Name = "Testing1" }, new {Id =2, Name ="Testing2" }}; 

I came up with this when I wrote something similar for making a Anonymous List for a custom type.

share|improve this answer

I usually use the following; mainly because you then "start" with a list that's empty.

var list = Enumerable.Range(0, 0).Select(e => new { ID = 1, Name = ""}).ToList();
list.Add(new {ID = 753159, Name = "Lamont Cranston"} );
//etc.
share|improve this answer
2  
You don't need to start with an empty list - you can do Range(0,1) and make your first object in the select statement be.. the first object. –  Matthew M. May 28 at 16:02
    
You don't need to start with an empty list -- in the case where you know what the first item is (as in the example) then you're right in your comment. Many times though I use this for parsing an intermediate file / data source and don't access the first true item until using it in a LINQ projection scenario (and thus don't need to account for skipping the first record). –  Rostov May 29 at 17:19

Instead of this:

var o = new { Id = 1, Name = "Foo" }; 
var o1 = new { Id = 2, Name = "Bar" }; 

List <var> list = new List<var>(); 
list.Add(o); 
list.Add(o1);

You could do this:

var o = new { Id = 1, Name = "Foo" }; 
var o1 = new { Id = 2, Name = "Bar" }; 

List<object> list = new List<object>(); 
list.Add(o); 
list.Add(o1);

However, you will get a compiletime error if you try to do something like this in another scope, although it works at runtime:

private List<object> GetList()
{ 
    List<object> list = new List<object>();
    var o = new { Id = 1, Name = "Foo" }; 
    var o1 = new { Id = 2, Name = "Bar" }; 
    list.Add(o); 
    list.Add(o1);
    return list;
}

private void WriteList()
{
    foreach (var item in GetList()) 
    { 
        Console.WriteLine("Name={0}{1}", item.Name, Environment.NewLine); 
    }
}

The problem is that only the members of Object are available at runtime, although intellisense will show the properties id and name.

In .net 4.0 a solution is to use the keyword dynamic istead of object in the code above.

Another solution is to use reflection to get the properties

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Reflection;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Program p = new Program();
            var anonymous = p.GetList(new[]{
                new { Id = 1, Name = "Foo" },       
                new { Id = 2, Name = "Bar" }
            });

            p.WriteList(anonymous);
        }

        private List<T> GetList<T>(params T[] elements)
        {
            var a = TypeGenerator(elements);
            return a;
        }

        public static List<T> TypeGenerator<T>(T[] at)
        {
            return new List<T>(at);
        }

        private void WriteList<T>(List<T> elements)
        {
            PropertyInfo[] pi = typeof(T).GetProperties();
            foreach (var el in elements)
            {
                foreach (var p in pi)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("{0}", p.GetValue(el, null));
                }
            }
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
var list = new[]{
new{
FirstField = default(string),
SecondField = default(int),
ThirdField = default(double)
}
}.ToList();
list.RemoveAt(0);
share|improve this answer

You can do it this way:

var o = new { Id = 1, Name = "Foo" };
var o1 = new { Id = 2, Name = "Bar" };

var array = new[] { o, o1 };
var list = array.ToList();

list.Add(new { Id = 3, Name = "Yeah" });

It seems a little "hacky" to me, but it works - if you really need to have a list and can't just use the anonymous array.

share|improve this answer

Try with this:

var result = new List<object>();

foreach (var test in model.ToList()) {
   result.Add(new {Id = test.IdSoc,Nom = test.Nom});
}
share|improve this answer

For your second example, where you have to initialize a new List<T>, one idea is to create an anonymous list, and then clear it.

var list = new[] { o, o1 }.ToList();
list.Clear();

//and you can keep adding.
while (....)
{
    ....
    list.Add(new { Id = x, Name = y });
    ....
}

Or as an extension method, should be easier:

public static List<T> GetEmptyListOfThisType<T>(this T item)
{
    return new List<T>();
}

//so you can call:
var list = new { Id = 0, Name = "" }.GetEmptyListOfThisType();
share|improve this answer
static void Main()
{
    List<int> list = new List<int>();
    list.Add(2);
    list.Add(3);
    list.Add(5);
    list.Add(7);
}
share|improve this answer
2  
I see no anonymous classes, here. –  Andrew Barber Sep 21 '12 at 21:56

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