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  1. In a Python Regex, must ^ or $ appear just once?
  2. I tried to match two lines with

    ^(.*\|.*)$^.*$
    

    It does not work. How do you match several lines?

Note: I am not programming in Python, but using Python-style Regex in my editor gedit.

Thanks and regards!

share|improve this question
    
OP needs this for gedit. I suggest askubuntu.com. BTW, can a question be moved to askubuntu from here? It is not in the list when we mention offtopic while voting for close. –  manojlds May 25 '11 at 16:16
    
I don't think there is fundamental difference on where to ask about using Python-style Regex. –  Tim May 25 '11 at 16:19
    
this is specific to how gedit uses it. It has nothing to do with Programming. And you are not asking for what regex to use, but how to add the flags and gedit and any of it's plugins don't seem to have the ability to do multiline. –  manojlds May 25 '11 at 16:35

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As other answers have said, you are looking for re.MULTILINE, but even with that your regex won't work.

$ matches the position before the line break, and ^ matches the start of a line, so $^ in the middle of a regex will never match. For example:

>>> re.search("^(.*)$^.*$", multiline_string, re.M)    # won't match
>>> re.search("^(.*)$\n^.*$", multiline_string, re.M)  # will match
<_sre.SRE_Match object at 0xb7f3e5e0>

You need something to match the end of line characters between the $ and the ^.

share|improve this answer
    
Very good observation. –  ThomasH May 25 '11 at 16:27

Take a look at re.MULTILINE.

I quote:

When specified, the pattern character '^' matches at the beginning of the string and at the beginning of each line (immediately following each newline); and the pattern character '$' matches at the end of the string and at the end of each line (immediately preceding each newline).

By default, '^' matches only at the beginning of the string, and '$' only at the end of the string and immediately before the newline (if any) at the end of the string.

share|improve this answer

You have to use re.MULTILINE ( or even re.DOTALL if you change regex and depending on what you actually want to match / do )

re.MULTILINE

When specified, the pattern character '^' matches at the beginning of the string and at the beginning of each line (immediately following each newline); and the pattern character '$' matches at the end of the string and at the end of each line (immediately preceding each newline).

By default, '^' matches only at the beginning of the string, and '$' only at the end of the string and immediately before the newline (if any) at the end of the string.

http://docs.python.org/library/re.html

BTW, what are you doing with - ^(.*\|.*)$^.*$ - that is not a very good regex! ( ignoring the fact that you have the multiple $ and ^ which is the point of the question. )

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Would it be possible not to use Python functions? I am using Python-style Regex in editor gedit, instead of programming in Python. –  Tim May 25 '11 at 16:05
    
@Tim If that is the case, this is not a place for that question actually. You can try askubuntu.com –  manojlds May 25 '11 at 16:14
    
Just to clarify: re.DOTALL does not change the meaning of ^ and $, while re.MULTILINE does. –  ThomasH May 25 '11 at 16:15
    
@ThomasH - yes of course, the highlight being "if you change the regex" What I meant was you can use re.DOTALL to acheive what the OP wants from the actual problem point of view. –  manojlds May 25 '11 at 16:19

To add to other answers. You can get away with putting the re.MULTILINE modifier directly into the regex:

(?m)^(.*\|.*)$\n^.*$
share|improve this answer
    
You dropped the backslash from \|. –  Alan Moore May 25 '11 at 17:06
    
@Alan Cheers, fixed. –  ThomasH May 25 '11 at 17:08
    
holy crapspackle you saved me @ThomasH –  symphonyblade Nov 21 '13 at 0:25

I would refer to the python regex manual http://docs.python.org/library/re.html#re.MULTILINE

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Prefixing your regex with (?m) should do what you need (tells the regex engine that it's going to receive multiline texts, and that ^/$ match the beginning/end of a line instead of the whole text).

Edit: after looking at your regex a bit more, I think you also need to put (?s), meaning that you want dot to match newline characters. For example:

(?m)(?s)^hello.*?world$

correctly matched "helloworld" for me in a case like this:

dssdf
hello
world
sdfasdf
share|improve this answer
    
It looks to me like the OP wants to match exactly two lines; he just needs to bridge the gap between them by explicitly consuming the line separator. Adding the (?s) changes the meaning of the regex completely, and it still won't work because of the $^ in the middle (as @Andrew observed). –  Alan Moore May 25 '11 at 17:26
    
Of course, I'm proposing to drop the $^ in favour of something else. Anyways, $ doesn't match an actual character, therefore \n will never be consumed and $^ is unlikely to match anything at all. $\n^ is better, but I wouldn't use it if I know that anything in the next line will be ok - I'd rather do (?m)(?s)hello.*?$.+?$ –  King_DuckZ May 25 '11 at 21:14

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