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I know it's a very general question but I'm becoming mad.

I used this code:

String ucs2Content = new String(bufferToConvert, inputEncoding);        
        byte[] outputBuf = ucs2Content.getBytes(outputEncoding);        
        return outputBuf;

But I read that is better to use CharsetDecoder and CharsetEncoder (I have contents with some character probably outside the destination encoding). I've just written this code but that has some problems:

// Create the encoder and decoder for Win1252
Charset charsetInput = Charset.forName(inputEncoding);
CharsetDecoder decoder = charsetInput.newDecoder();

Charset charsetOutput = Charset.forName(outputEncoding);
CharsetEncoder encoder = charsetOutput.newEncoder();

// Convert the byte array from starting inputEncoding into UCS2
CharBuffer cbuf = decoder.decode(ByteBuffer.wrap(bufferToConvert));

// Convert the internal UCS2 representation into outputEncoding
ByteBuffer bbuf = encoder.encode(CharBuffer.wrap(cbuf));
return bbuf.array();

Indeed this code appends to the buffer a sequence of null character!!!!!

Could someone tell me where is the problem? I'm not so skilled with encoding conversion in Java.

Is there a better way to convert encoding in Java?

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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your problem is that ByteBuffer.array() returns a direct reference to the array used as backing store for the ByteBuffer and not a copy of the backing array's valid range. You have to obey bbuf.limit() (as Peter did in his response) and just use the array content from index 0 to bbuf.limit()-1.

The reason for the extra 0 values in the backing array is a slight flaw in how the resulting ByteBuffer is created by the CharsetEncoder. Each CharsetEncoder has an "average bytes per character", which for the UCS2 encoder seem to be simple and correct (2 bytes/char). Obeying this fixed value, the CharsetEncoder initially allocates a ByteBuffer with "string length * average bytes per character" bytes, in this case e.g. 20 bytes for a 10 character long string. The UCS2 CharsetEncoder starts however with a BOM (byte order mark), which also occupies 2 bytes, so that only 9 of the 10 characters fit in the allocated ByteBuffer. The CharsetEncoder detects the overflow and allocates a new ByteBuffer with a length of 2*n+1 (n being the original length of the ByteBuffer), in this case 2*20+1 = 41 bytes. Since only 2 of the 21 new bytes are required to encode the remaining character, the array you get from bbuf.array() will have a length of 41 bytes, but bbuf.limit() will indicate that only the first 22 entries are actually used.

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Thanks, you probably just saved me several hours of frustration –  pepsi Aug 11 '11 at 19:29
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I am not sure how you get a sequence of null characters. Try this

String outputEncoding = "UTF-8";
Charset charsetOutput = Charset.forName(outputEncoding);
CharsetEncoder encoder = charsetOutput.newEncoder();

// Convert the byte array from starting inputEncoding into UCS2
byte[] bufferToConvert = "Hello World! £€".getBytes();
CharBuffer cbuf = decoder.decode(ByteBuffer.wrap(bufferToConvert));

// Convert the internal UCS2 representation into outputEncoding
ByteBuffer bbuf = encoder.encode(CharBuffer.wrap(cbuf));
System.out.println(new String(bbuf.array(), 0, bbuf.limit(), charsetOutput));

prints

Hello World! £€
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But you have to declare a CharsetDecoder from the input encoding. Something like: CharsetDecoder decoder = charsetInput.newEncoder() where charsetInput = Charset.forName("cp1252"). –  robob May 25 '11 at 17:37
    
there is a similar question: stackoverflow.com/questions/1252468/… –  robob May 25 '11 at 17:44
    
do you think null sequence could be the missing "decoder.flush" and "encoder.flush"? I see also you didn't use flush() in your code... –  robob May 25 '11 at 18:06
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