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Can you confirm my understanding of HTML5's <script async> attribute?

  • Any libraries referenced by other code in the page should not specify the async attribute.

For example, my script references might appropriately look like:

<script src="jquery..." />         <!-- async not used - ensure that this is loaded before JQuery UI and my code -->
<script src="jquery.ui..." />      <!-- async not used - ensure that this is loaded before my code -->
<script src="my_code1.js" async /> <!-- async used, for page load performance -->
<script src="my_code2.js" async /> <!-- async used, for page load performance -->
  • For any code in a $(document).ready(function () { } block, I can be assured that all async script have already loaded.

Do I have this right?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 24 down vote accepted

As with all new HTML5 features, I think the best way to find answers is to test them on as many current browsers as we can. As a general rule, old browsers should completely ignore the async flag, so code should work as expected, parsed from top to bottom in order.

As long as browsers are inconsistent in handling them, you should avoid using them in production code if you're not sure they will work.

The main question with this feature is, browsers that do support it, in what order do events get fired, for example if you define a jQuery ready function in an async loaded script, is it going to get fired? Does your ready event fire before or after async scripts have loaded?

I have created a couple of test files, you are quite welcome to have a play with them on different browsers to see how they behave.


Short Answer

About @Dave's assumption:

For any code in a $(document).ready(function(){} block, I can be assured that all async script have already loaded.

It doesn't look like it so far, it's pretty inconsistent. In Chrome the main ready event fires before the async file has loaded, but in Firefox it fires after it.

jQuery developers will have to make up their minds about this, if they will (and can) support it in the future or not.


Test Page

My test script spits out a string which shows you in what order were different parts of it executed. It can be built by the following:

  • D: It means the script block in the main file got executed. It can be followed by :ok if the function in the async loaded script if defined, or :undefined if it's not.

  • R: It means the jQuery ready event in the main file got executed. It can be followed by :ok if the function in the async loaded script if defined, or :undefined if it's not.

  • L: Async loaded script file has been executed.

  • AR: jQuery ready event in the async loaded script has been executed.


Test Results

Browsers supporting async:

  • Google Chrome 11.0.696.68: D:undefined R:undefined L AR

  • Firefox 4.0.1: D:undefined L R:ok AR

Browsers supporting async but tested without async (expecting same results):

  • Google Chrome 11.0.696.68: L D:ok AR R:ok

  • Firefox 4.0.1: L D:ok AR R:ok

Browsers NOT supporting async (expecting same results):

  • Internet Explorer 9: L D:ok AR R:ok

  • Opera 11.11: L D:ok AR R:ok


Test Script

test.html

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<head>
    <title>Async Test</title>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        var result = "";
    </script>

    <script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.6.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="test.js" async></script>

    <script type="text/javascript">
    try{
        myFunc();
        result += "D:ok ";
    } catch(ex) { result += "D:undefined "; }

    $(function(){
        try{
            myFunc();
            result += "R:ok ";
        } catch(ex) { result += "R:undefined "; }
        $('body').text(result);
    });
    </script>
</head>
<body>
</body>
</html>

test.js

// Fires straight away when this file is loaded.
result += "L ";
$('body').text(result);

// A test function to see if it's defined in certain parts of the main file.
function myFunc(){
    return;
}

// A ready function to see if it fires when loaded async.
$(function(){
    result += "AR ";
    $('body').text(result);
});
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3  
DarthJDG, thanks for the time that you put into this response! It's very helpful, and it shows me that (for now), I'll need to limit my use of async to operations that don't have or create dependencies. –  Dave Clausen May 26 '11 at 11:47
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