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How do I declare a function pointer that points to a function taking the same function pointer as the argument?

I've tried the following without success:

typedef void (*fnptr)(void (*)());

void func(fnptr)
{
    /* ... */
}

void func2(fnptr)
{
    /* ... */
}

void main()
{
    fnptr fn = &func;
    func2(fn);
}

Is this possible?

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1  
Im not sure if you can,it would be like trying to templatize something with itself, you just end up with a recursive declaration –  Dan F May 25 '11 at 17:23
    
I rather think it cannot be done. –  Jonathan Leffler May 25 '11 at 17:23
2  
How about just using a generic declaration and an explicit cast? –  casablanca May 25 '11 at 17:24
    
Why on earth would anyone want to do that ? –  Alexandre C. May 25 '11 at 17:41
    
A function cannot easily take itself as a parameter, can it? What would be the use of that? –  Bo Persson May 25 '11 at 17:46
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5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I very much doubt it, but you can get the needed recursion by introducing a struct.

struct Rec;

typedef void (*RecFun)(const Rec&);

struct Rec {
    RecFun fun;
};

Example of use:

#include <iostream>

void nothing(const Rec& rec) {}
Rec recNothing = { nothing };

void f(const Rec& rec)
{
    std::cout << "f\n";
    rec.fun(recNothing);
}
Rec recF = { f };

void g(const Rec& rec)
{
    std::cout << "g\n";
    rec.fun(recNothing);
}
Rec recG = { g };

int main()
{
    recF.fun(recG);
}

Update: As per the suggestions of Chris, Vitus, and Johannes, here are some convenient implicit conversions (as in Herb Sutter's GotW #57):

struct Rec;

typedef void (*RecFun)(const Rec&);

struct Rec {
    RecFun fun;
    Rec(RecFun fun) : fun(fun) {}
    operator RecFun() const { return fun; }
};
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1  
+1 Elegant method for managing the recursion problem. –  dusktreader May 25 '11 at 17:36
1  
You could even override operator() so that it looks and behaves like a function (a functor), if you prefer that syntax –  Chris Frederick May 25 '11 at 17:45
    
Perfect answer! Thanks alot! :D –  Oskar Walker May 25 '11 at 18:04
    
Related reading: GotW #57 –  Vitus May 25 '11 at 19:13
1  
You were close to solving it. By abusing the way the question was posed, you can actually solve it. The question asked for a function that takes the same function as argument. That means, if your struct has a converting constructor that converts from the function, then you actually have a function that takes itself as an argument. He did not ask for a function that has its own type as a parameter type. –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 26 '11 at 21:39
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Alas, it cannot be done. It would be nice if you could use typename to forward declare a typedef; something like:

typename fnptr;
typedef (*fnptr)(fnptr);

but that does not work, because typename is restricted to a few specific template uses

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The easiest way is to just typedef both. A function pointer is a parameter just like any other type:

typedef (* InnerFunctionPtr)(void);
typedef (* OuterFunctionPtr)(InnerFunctionPtr);

Edit: Folks have pointed out you mean both to be the same type. In that case, it's not possible, as the type would be recursive. It's impossible to create a complete type specification (the type of the function's parameter is never completely specified, ergo...)

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2  
I think the OP means an argument of the same type. –  casablanca May 25 '11 at 17:22
    
The 'OuterFunctionPtr' would have to take an 'OuterFunctionPtr' as an argument. –  Jonathan Leffler May 25 '11 at 17:25
    
-1. Wrong typedef! –  Nawaz May 25 '11 at 17:32
    
I see. Updating my answer. –  Jonathan Grynspan May 25 '11 at 17:44
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it is possible in this way:

typedef void (*fnptr)(void (*)());

fnptr fn1,fn2;
void func(fn1)
{
/* ... */
}

void func2(fn2)
{
/* ... */
}
void main()
{
fnptr fn = &func;
func2(fn);
}
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You can also defeat the type system by pretending that the function takes some other function pointer type, and then casting it when you pass something to the function and inside the function to get the original type back.

Not recommended obviously, but just putting it out there.

typedef void (*fnptr)(void (*)());

void func(void (*x)())
{
    fnptr f = (fnptr)x;
    /* ... */
}

void func2(void (*x)())
{
    fnptr f = (fnptr)x;
    /* ... */
}

void main()
{
    fnptr fn = &func;
    func2((void (*)())fn);
}
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