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I am using Keith Wood for a cool countdown clock and am noticing some off behavior and was looking to see if anyone could nail it. The clock seems to pause after watching it count down for a while. It seems to track the right time but as you will see it just seems to pause a more than a second after several seconds.

If you watch it for about 30 seconds you will see it

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/2982102/temp/countdownclock_052411/index.html

Any help on this would be huge

Thanks

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The issue is perhaps that the plugin appears to update using an interval of 980ms, presumably with the hope of ensuring it will execute each second. Of course, over time this interval will drift far from the boundary between seconds and could end up skipping the occasional second.

The obvious solution is to decrease the interval (perhaps slightly less than 500ms which should safely ensure it is executed at least once per second 99.9% of the time). This should be safe, although it might be worth looking at the performance to ensure it isn't too taxing.

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This fixed it. thanks! –  Quotient May 25 '11 at 19:25

I'm not seeing what you describe.

However, something like this, client-side code, depends totally on the user's computer configuration & browser, therefore, performance might vary greatly. For any issues related to this, there's not much you can do.

It also appears as if some of the graphics for the numbers are not fully loaded, or perhaps they are still loading "on the fly". It might be worthwhile to see if this plugin is pre-loading the images. If not, you may want to pre-load them yourself.

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It seems to sometimes run a little too fast and start to get ahead of the correct value.

The pause is when it's showing the same value for 2 consecutive ticks, the first being ahead (ie, wrong) and the second being correct.

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