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Given:

public class E
{
  public object Y { get; set; }
}

I am trying the following code:

var m = RuntimeTypeModel.Default;
m.Add(typeof(E), false).Add("Y");
// m.Add(typeof(object), false).AddSubType(1, typeof(int));

var e = new E { Y = 5 };
using (var ms = new MemoryStream())
{
  m.Serialize(ms, e);
  ms.Position = 0;
  var e2 = (E)m.Deserialize(ms, null, typeof(E));
  Debug.Assert(e.Y.Equals(e2.Y));
}

It fails with:

System.InvalidOperationException occurred
  Message=No serializer defined for type: System.Object
  Source=protobuf-net
  StackTrace:
       at ProtoBuf.Meta.ValueMember.GetCoreSerializer(Type type, WireType& defaultWireType, Boolean asReference, Boolean dynamicType) in C:\Work\protobuf-net-v2\protobuf-net\Meta\ValueMember.cs:line 398
  InnerException: 

So, I uncomment the third line, but then I get:

System.ArgumentException occurred
  Message=Not valid for primitive types
Parameter name: type
  Source=protobuf-net
  ParamName=type
  StackTrace:
       at ProtoBuf.Meta.MetaType..ctor(RuntimeTypeModel model, Type type) in C:\Work\protobuf-net-v2\protobuf-net\Meta\MetaType.cs:line 166
  InnerException: 

Hence, the question is - how do I (de)serialize an object property containing a primitive boxed value type instance?

Note, that the same approach does work with a non primitive value type, like DateTime (of course, I had to use a surrogate).

EDIT

If I comment the primitivity check in method ProtoBuf.Meta.MetaType.MetaType, then the following code works correctly:

static void Main()
{
  var m = RuntimeTypeModel.Default;
  m.Add(typeof(E), false).Add("Y");
  m.Add(typeof(object), false).AddSubType(1, typeof(int));
  m.Add(typeof(IntSurrogate), false).Add("Value");
  m.Add(typeof(int), false).SetSurrogate(typeof(IntSurrogate));

  var e = new E { Y = 5 };
  using (var ms = new MemoryStream())
  {
    m.Serialize(ms, e);
    ms.Position = 0;
    var e2 = (E)m.Deserialize(ms, null, typeof(E));
    Debug.Assert(e.Y.Equals(e2.Y));
  }
}

internal class IntSurrogate
{
  public static implicit operator int(IntSurrogate surrogate)
  {
    return surrogate.Value;
  }
  public static implicit operator IntSurrogate(int v)
  {
    return new IntSurrogate { Value = v };
  }

  internal int Value { get; set; }
}

Of course, I would like to see it work without the need for IntSurrogate.

share|improve this question
    
Well, I'm not sure this qualifies as "trivial" - try it with XmlSerializer, DataContractSerializer, etc - AFAIK they will all fail here –  Marc Gravell May 25 '11 at 23:01
    
@Marc - Sorry, it seemed trivial to me. I am using CSLA mobile serialization, which allows it. We have a problem that we need to port an existing application, so that it no longer uses CSLA. It is a long a painful process and dismissing the mobile serialization is the first and very important step. Is there a conceptual difficulty to handle the presented case? After all, it works with non primitive value types (through the surrogates, of course). –  mark May 26 '11 at 3:42
    
@mark - the dynamic type option would probably work, but it might be quite expensive on the wire –  Marc Gravell May 26 '11 at 21:48
    
@marc - I would like to understand what is the conceptual problem? As I see it, protobuf-net has already diverged from the original intention of the google protocol buffers. People want to use as the replacement of the standard serialization facilities found in .NET and even more so in Silverlight. This is the impression I get from browsing the web. And this is certainly true for me. Of course, if I was designing a new system, I would not stumble upon these problems of integeres boxed as objects traveling over the wire. Alas, this is not the case. –  mark May 27 '11 at 19:27
    
@marc - The product is already there and so are the design mistakes. So, I am wondering what is the conceptual difference between having a boxed integer and a boxed DateTime? –  mark May 27 '11 at 19:27

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