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I am using an interface that only allows me to use SQL commands. The database is SQL Server. Right now I need to open a stored procedure and read what is inside of it. What is the SQL command to open a stored procedure for reading? Thank you.

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Which version of SQL Server? –  JNK May 25 '11 at 19:34
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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted
SELECT definition
    FROM sys.sql_modules 
    WHERE object_id = OBJECT_ID('YourSchemaName.YourProcedureName')
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3  
Always nice to see use of sys.sql_modules rather than syscomments and the INFORMATION_SCHEMA rubbish –  gbn May 25 '11 at 20:03
    
I'd love to know why this is better than sp_helptext.. –  Fosco May 26 '11 at 20:20
    
@Fosco: This returns a single nvarchar(max) result. sp_helptext "displays the definition that is used to create an object in multiple rows. Each row contains 255 characters of the Transact-SQL definition." –  Joe Stefanelli May 26 '11 at 20:25
    
Ah... With results-to-text there is no issue with 255 character limit. It would be silly to use results-to-table, absolutely. –  Fosco May 26 '11 at 20:26
    
Thank you and sorry for the long delay confirming the right answer. Just today I got back to this issue. –  Marcos Buarque Jun 15 '11 at 17:18
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SELECT OBJECT_DEFINITION(OBJECT_ID('dbo.myStoredProc'))

Note: subject to Metadata Visibility and VIEW DEFINITION rights

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sp_helptext 'dbo.myStoredProc'
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SELECT TEXT
FROM syscomments
WHERE id = (SELECT id FROM sysobjects WHERE name = '<NAME>')
ORDER BY colid 
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2  
This truncates at the 4000th character... –  gbn May 25 '11 at 19:59
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