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I am trying to replace a character - say ; - with a new line using replace-string and/or replace-regexp in Emacs.

I have tried the following commands:

  • M-x replace-string RET ; RET \n

    This will replace ; with 2 characters: \n.

  • M-x replace-regex RET ; RET \n

    This results in the following error (shown in the minibuffer):

    Invalid use of `\' in replacement text.

What's wrong with using replace-string for this task? Is there any other way to do it?

Thanks.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 110 down vote accepted

M-x replace-string RET ; RET C-q C-j.

  • C-q for quoted-insert,

  • C-j is a newline.

Cheers!

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C-q is really quote-insert which quotes the next character. –  Joe Casadonte Mar 5 '09 at 2:17
    
I believe it's actually "quoted" rather than "quote", as in "quoted-insert". At least that's the way it is on version 22.1. –  Bryan Oakley Mar 5 '09 at 15:50
3  
So why doesn't Ret work instead of C-j after the C-q? –  Cactus Aug 2 '12 at 3:16
4  
Because it's Emacs. –  Mike Weller May 10 '13 at 14:39
2  
C-j is a literal 0x0a control code, versus Ret which is the key next to your quote and sends 0x0d. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C0_and_C1_control_codes –  Jonathan Arkell Jan 23 at 18:28

Don't forget that you can always cut and paste into the minibuffer.

So you can just copy a newline character (or any string) from your buffer, then yank it when prompted for the replacement text.

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It's really a good idea for the characters which I don't know the key bind. –  Lei Mar 5 '09 at 18:16

There are four ways I've found to put a newline into the minibuffer.

  1. C-o

  2. C-q C-j

  3. C-q 12 (12 is the octal value of newline)

  4. C-x o to the main window, kill a newline with C-k, then C-x o back to the minibuffer, yank it with C-y

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1  
+1 for mentioning C-o! One less key stroke compared to C-q C-j. Hadn't thought of using that one before. –  itsjeyd Apr 9 at 9:53
    
Thanks for version 4! Helpful if you have C-o and C-q rebound. –  Joachim Wuttke Jun 24 at 6:58

More explicitly:

To replace the semi colon character (;) with a newline, follow these exact steps.

  1. locate cursor at upper left of buffer containing text you want to change
  2. Type m-x replace-string and hit RETURN
  3. the mini-buffer will display something like this: Replace string (default ^ -> ):
  4. Type in the character you want to replace. In this case, ; and hit RETURN
  5. the mini-buffer will display something like this: string ; with:
  6. Now execute C-q C-j
  7. All instances of semi-colon will be replaced a newline (from the cursor location to the end of the buffer will now appear)

Bit more to it than the original explanation says.

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Switch to text-mode

M-x text-mode

Highlight block to indent

Indent

C+M \

Switch back to whatever mode..

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