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I am pretty new to php but I'm stuck on this problem... Say i wait to put a link to another site with a given parameter, how do I do it correclty?

This is what i have now:

<html>
<body>
<?php
  $param = "test";

  echo "<a href="http://www.whatever.com/$param">Click Here</a>;
?>

</body>
</html>
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7 Answers 7

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Well, for starters, you might not wanna overuse echo, because (as is the problem in your case) you can very easely make mistakes on quotation marks

what woulda fixed your problem is this:

echo "<a href=\"http://www.whatever.com/$param\">Click Here</a>";

but what you really should do is

<?php
  $param = "test";
?>
<a href="http://www.whatever.com/<?php echo $param; ?>">Click Here</a>
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Thanks, that worked. I'll look more into seperating HTML and PHP I suppose :-) –  Jasper May 25 '11 at 20:57
    
first example is well for me but I guess for the second one, you need to echo the <a href... part... –  ardaozkal Jun 3 at 19:42

You can do it a number of ways, depending on the type of quotes you use:

  • echo "<a href='http://www.whatever.com/$param'>Click here</a>";
  • echo "<a href='http://www.whatever.com/{$param}'>Click here</a>";
  • echo '<a href="http://www.whatever.com/' . $param . '">Click here</a>';
  • echo "<a href=\"http://www.whatever.com/$param\">Click here</a>";

Double quotes allow for variables in the middle of the string, where as single quotes are string literals and, as such, interpret everything as a string of characters -- nothing more -- not even \n will be expanded to mean the new line character, it will just be the characters \ and n in sequence.

You need to be careful about your use of whichever type of quoting you decide. You can't use double quotes inside a double quoted string (as in your example) as you'll be ending the string early, which isn't what you want. You can escape the inner double quotes, however, by adding a backslash.

On a separate note, you might need to be careful about XSS attacks when printing unsafe variables (populated by the user) out to the browser.

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The third one is the best option, because default in HTML are double quotes, and strings in single quotes are parsed faster in PHP. –  Midas May 25 '11 at 20:49
1  
@Midas There are 3 microseconds (over 1k iterations) in it apparently - phpbench.com which suggest that this is a micro-optimisation that totally isn't worth it. See stackoverflow.com/questions/482202/… –  Nick May 25 '11 at 21:02

You can embed a variable into a double quoted string like my first example, or you can use concantenation(the period) like in my second example:

echo "<a href=\"http://www.whatever.com/$param\">Click Here</a>";

echo '<a href="http://www.whatever.com/' . $param . '">Click Here</a>';

Notice that I escaped the double quotes inside my first example using a backslash.

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I recommend using the short ' instead of ". If you do so, you wont longer have to escape the double quote (\").

In that case you would write

echo '<a href="http://www.whatever.com/'. $param .'">Click Here</a>';

But look onto nicolaas' answer "what you really should do" to learn how to produce cleaner code.

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There's a shorthand-type way to do this that I have been using recently. This might need to be configured, but it should work in most mainline PHP installations. If you're storing the link in a PHP variable, you can do it in the following manner based off the OP:

<html>
  <body>
    <?php
      $link = "http://www.google.com";
    ?>
    <a href="<?= $link ?>">Click here to go to Google.</a>
  </body>
</html>

This will evaluate the variable as a string, in essence shorthand for echo $link;

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Heredoc may be an option, see example 2 here: http://php.net/manual/en/language.types.string.php

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HI Jasper,

you can do this:

<?
sprintf("<a href=\"http://www.whatever.com/%s\">Click Here</a>", $param);
?>
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