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One of my mysql user borked his production database this way:

He exported all the data to a dumpfile, then he deleted all the content, then he imported his data back into the database. He saved some Gigs from the Innodb big tablespace (I dunno why he did this but that isn't the point).

Now we have a problem.

The time returned by now() is always the same, the time of the operation (I dunno if this is the export time or import time).

Demo:

mysql> \! date
Wed May 25 22:49:24 CEST 2011
mysql> select now();
+---------------------+
| now()               |
+---------------------+
| 2011-05-07 05:34:52 |    <--- the date of the export/import, mysql is stuck at this date
+---------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> select sysdate();
+---------------------+
| sysdate()           |
+---------------------+
| 2011-05-07 05:34:52 |
+---------------------+
1 row in set (0.01 sec)

mysql> show variables like 'timestamp';
+---------------+------------+
| Variable_name | Value      |
+---------------+------------+
| timestamp     | 1304739292 |  <-- timestamp is stuck to this value
+---------------+------------+

mysql> set timestamp=1;        <-- i can manually change the time returned by now()
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> select now();
+---------------------+
| now()               |
+---------------------+
| 1970-01-01 01:00:01 |
+---------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> select sysdate();
+---------------------+
| sysdate()           |
+---------------------+
| 2011-05-07 05:34:52 |   <--- but sysdate() is still stuck
+---------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

Any idea how I could fix this without restarting mysqld or reimporting the data?

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And what's in MySQL's error log? –  Mel May 25 '11 at 21:56
    
My bad, the logs were disabled. –  CamilleHuot May 26 '11 at 13:35
    
Do you have the --sysdate-is-now option set to cause SYSDATE() to return the same value as NOW()? This would help in trying to work out the underlying problem –  Pervez Choudhury May 31 '11 at 17:59

1 Answer 1

Wild guess here: if "--sysdate-is-now" option is set in mysql, then SYSDATE() behaves like NOW() - so you wouldn't see any difference between the 2 functions as you described above. From http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/date-and-time-functions.html#function_sysdate :

SYSDATE() returns the time at which it executes. This differs from the behavior for NOW(), which returns a constant time that indicates the time at which the statement began to execute.

Eventually your import process did not finish for some reason? Check the process list with "SHOW PROCESSLIST" and then do a "KILL (Process_Id)" and see if that helps to get you time functions back on track.

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