Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following piece of code in my Spring MVC application:

@RequestMapping(value = "/ping")
public void ping () {

}

I want to respond to that request with a simple plain text with:

OK!

But I'm currently using a ResourceBundleViewResolver, having my jsp's in the WEB-INF/views folder... Is there a way to output plain text only by modifying the content of my ping () method? Thanks!

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this:

@RequestMapping(value = "/ping")
@ResponseBody
public String ping () {
   return "OK!";
}
share|improve this answer

Another posibility:

@RequestMapping(value = "/ping")
public void ping (HttpServletResponse response) {
PrintWriter out;
response.setContentType("text/plain");
try {
out = response.getWriter();
out.write(message);
}
catch (IOException ex) {
     ex.printStackTrace();

} finally {
  out.close();
}
}

If you need to return text, use what @skaffman suggested it's better aproach, if you need to return file or any other object with different content type (file or file chunk, for example) you can use this approach.

share|improve this answer
    
The combination of @ResponseBody and void return type makes no sense. –  skaffman May 26 '11 at 8:44
    
@skaffman, are you saying that if i'm sending something using HttpServletResponse I don't need @ResponseBody annotation? Will it work? I have never tested it. –  danny.lesnik May 26 '11 at 9:31
    
Correct. @ResponseBody refers to the return value. If your controller method declares HttpServletResponse or Writer as a parameter, Spring assumes you're handling the response yourself. –  skaffman May 26 '11 at 10:22
    
skaffman, Thanks, it makes sence, good to know. +1 –  danny.lesnik May 26 '11 at 10:35
    
Very nice tips, I'll consider them, but for my situation in only need what @skaffman proposed, thanks! –  Joaquín L. Robles May 26 '11 at 13:24

Use the mvc namespace. Something like Viewname = jspfile

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.