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I've run into a couple of cases now where it would be convenient to be able to find the "topmost" view controller (the one responsible for the current view), but haven't found a way to do it.

Basically the challenge is this: Given that one is executing in a class that is not a view controller (or a view) [and does not have the address of an active view] and has not been passed the address of the topmost view controller (or, say, the address of the navigation controller), is it possible to find that view controller? (And, if so, how?)

Or, failing that, is it possible to find the topmost view?

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3  
Eh.... this smells like you've got some poorly designed code. –  Dave DeLong May 25 '11 at 23:02
    
So you're saying it's not possible. –  Hot Licks May 26 '11 at 0:06
    
@Daniel no, I'm saying that it seems like your code could use some re-designing, because you should rarely need to know this. Also, the idea of "topmost" is only valid in certain contexts, and even then not always. –  Dave DeLong May 26 '11 at 0:08
    
@Daniel I had misread your question. There are lots of ifs and buts trying to answer this one. It depends on your view controller flow. @Wilbur's answer should be a good starting point to trace it down. –  Deepak Danduprolu May 26 '11 at 0:41
2  
@Daniel: Adding a second UIWindow works well for alert view-like overlays. –  Wilbur Vandrsmith May 26 '11 at 23:09

14 Answers 14

up vote 18 down vote accepted

iOS 4 introduced the rootViewController property on UIWindow:

[UIApplication sharedApplication].keyWindow.rootViewController;

You'll need to set it yourself after you create the view controller though.

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17  
Wilbur, this will give you the opposite of what the op asked for. rootViewController is the base view controller rather than the top most. –  m4rkk Jan 25 '12 at 21:17
    
m4rkk: "Top-most" depends on which direction you're looking from. Do new controllers get added to the top (stack-like) or the bottom (tree-like)? In any case, the OP mentioned the navigation controller as being on top, which implies the grows-downward view. –  Wilbur Vandrsmith Jan 28 '12 at 0:42
8  
Word „top“ is used for the view controller, that is visualy on the top (like -[UINavigationController topViewController]). Then there is word „root“, which is the root of the tree (like -[UIWindow rootViewController]. –  iMartin Jun 1 '13 at 17:04
    
for a root controller of navigation controller that was presented on existing view controller, top controller won't be the window's root controller.. –  tGilani Dec 10 '13 at 7:00

I think you need a combination of the accepted answer and @fishstix's

+ (UIViewController*) topMostController
{
    UIViewController *topController = [UIApplication sharedApplication].keyWindow.rootViewController;

    while (topController.presentedViewController) {
        topController = topController.presentedViewController;
    }

    return topController;
}
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1  
In addition, you can check for UINavigationController and ask for its topViewController or even check for UITabBarController and ask for selectedViewController. This will get you the view controller that is currently visible to the user. –  iMartin Jun 1 '13 at 17:07
4  
This is an incomplete solution, since it only traverses the hierarchy of modally presented view controllers, not the hierarchy of childViewControllers (as used by UINavigationController, UITabBarController, etc.). –  algal Jun 4 '13 at 12:45
2  
This is a great way to abstract out the presenting of a modal view controller that resumes to the current application state, in my case it was a password reentry screen after the application timed out. Thanks! –  erversteeg Nov 7 '13 at 18:09
1  
@algal: not really: UITabBarController, UINavigationController are already the topmost view controllers in the hierarchy. Depending on what you want to do with the "topmost controller" you might not want to traverse them at all and fiddle with their content. In my case it was to present a modal controller on top of everything, and for that I need to get the UINaviationController or UITabBarController, not their content!! –  Rick77 Mar 7 at 11:16
1  
@Rick77 This is an excellent point! Thank you for correcting me. One might also add that the view controllers managed by UINavigationController and UITabBarController are not "true" child view controllers, as they do not appear in childViewControllers. The bigger point here is that iOS has multiple kinds of view controller hierarchy: the childViewControllers, the modally presented view controllers, the view controllers managed by UINavigationControllers and UITabBarControllers, etc.. This is messier than the single view hierarchy. –  algal Mar 8 at 5:51

To complete JonasG's answer (who left out tab bar controllers while traversing), here is my version of returning the currently visible view controller:

- (UIViewController*)topViewController {
    return [self topViewControllerWithRootViewController:[UIApplication sharedApplication].keyWindow.rootViewController];
}

- (UIViewController*)topViewControllerWithRootViewController:(UIViewController*)rootViewController {
    if ([rootViewController isKindOfClass:[UITabBarController class]]) {
        UITabBarController* tabBarController = (UITabBarController*)rootViewController;
        return [self topViewControllerWithRootViewController:tabBarController.selectedViewController];
    } else if ([rootViewController isKindOfClass:[UINavigationController class]]) {
        UINavigationController* navigationController = (UINavigationController*)rootViewController;
        return [self topViewControllerWithRootViewController:navigationController.visibleViewController];
    } else if (rootViewController.presentedViewController) {
        UIViewController* presentedViewController = rootViewController.presentedViewController;
        return [self topViewControllerWithRootViewController:presentedViewController];
    } else {
        return rootViewController;
    }
}
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Nice, yeah I forgot about TabBar controllers :P –  JonasG Aug 25 '13 at 14:24
    
Doesn't include childViewControllers –  Awesome-o Jun 17 at 20:07

To complete Kleos answer (who left out view controllers added as subviews to some other view controllers while traversing), here is my version of returning the currently visible view controller:

- (UIViewController*)topViewController {
    return [self topViewControllerWithRootViewController:[UIApplication sharedApplication].keyWindow.rootViewController];
}

- (UIViewController*)topViewControllerWithRootViewController:(UIViewController*)rootViewController {
    if ([rootViewController isKindOfClass:[UITabBarController class]]) {
        UITabBarController* tabBarController = (UITabBarController*)rootViewController;
        return [self topViewControllerWithRootViewController:tabBarController.selectedViewController];
    } else if ([rootViewController isKindOfClass:[UINavigationController class]]) {
        UINavigationController* navigationController = (UINavigationController*)rootViewController;
        return [self topViewControllerWithRootViewController:navigationController.visibleViewController];
    } else if (rootViewController.presentedViewController) {
        UIViewController* presentedViewController = rootViewController.presentedViewController;
        return [self topViewControllerWithRootViewController:presentedViewController];
    } else {

        for (UIView *view in [rootViewController.view subviews])
        {
            id subViewController = [view nextResponder];
            if ( subViewController && [subViewController isKindOfClass:[UIViewController class]])
            {
                return [self topViewControllerWithRootViewController:subViewController];
            }
        }
        return rootViewController;
    }
}
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thanks rajesh.. –  Mohit tomar Jul 7 at 13:10

I recently got this situation in one my project, which required to displayed a notification view whatever the controller displayed was and whatever was the type (UINavigationController, classic controller or custom view controller), when network status changed.

So I juste released my code, which is quite easy and actually based on a protocol so that it is flexible with every type of container controller. It seems to be related with the last answers, but in a much flexible way.

You can grab the code here : PPTopMostController

And got the top most controller using

UIViewController *c = [UIViewController topMostController];
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Maaaan! This is awesome! You deserve more upvotes but I can do it only once ;) –  AXE Jan 4 at 0:04
    
Does not answer the question. –  Hot Licks Feb 26 at 12:38

This is an improvement to Eric's answer:

UIViewController *_topMostController(UIViewController *cont) {
    UIViewController *topController = cont;

    while (topController.presentedViewController) {
        topController = topController.presentedViewController;
    }

    if ([topController isKindOfClass:[UINavigationController class]]) {
        UIViewController *visible = ((UINavigationController *)topController).visibleViewController;
        if (visible) {
            topController = visible;
        }
    }

    return (topController != cont ? topController : nil);
}

UIViewController *topMostController() {
    UIViewController *topController = [UIApplication sharedApplication].keyWindow.rootViewController;

    UIViewController *next = nil;

    while ((next = _topMostController(topController)) != nil) {
        topController = next;
    }

    return topController;
}

_topMostController(UIViewController *cont) is a helper function.

Now all you need to do is call topMostController() and the top most UIViewController should be returned!

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Does not answer the question. –  Hot Licks Feb 26 at 12:38
- (UIViewController*)topViewController {
    return [self topViewControllerWithRootViewController:[UIApplication sharedApplication].keyWindow.rootViewController];
}

- (UIViewController*)topViewControllerWithRootViewController:(UIViewController*)rootViewController {
    if ([rootViewController isKindOfClass:[UITabBarController class]]) {
        UITabBarController* tabBarController = (UITabBarController*)rootViewController;
        return [self topViewControllerWithRootViewController:tabBarController.selectedViewController];
    } else if ([rootViewController isKindOfClass:[UINavigationController class]]) {
        UINavigationController* navigationController = (UINavigationController*)rootViewController;
        return [self topViewControllerWithRootViewController:navigationController.visibleViewController];
    } else if (rootViewController.presentedViewController) {
        UIViewController* presentedViewController = rootViewController.presentedViewController;
        return [self topViewControllerWithRootViewController:presentedViewController];
    } else {
        return rootViewController;
    }
}
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This answer includes childViewControllers and maintains a clean and readable implementation.

+ (UIViewController*)topViewController
{
    UIViewController *rootViewController = [UIApplication sharedApplication].keyWindow.rootViewController;

    return [rootViewController topVisibleViewController];
}

- (UIViewController*)topVisibleViewController
{
    if ([self isKindOfClass:[UITabBarController class]])
    {
        UITabBarController* tabBarController = (UITabBarController*)self;
        return [tabBarController.selectedViewController topVisibleViewController];
    }
    else if ([self isKindOfClass:[UINavigationController class]])
    {
        UINavigationController* navigationController = (UINavigationController*)self;
        return [navigationController.visibleViewController topVisibleViewController];
    }
    else if (self.presentedViewController)
    {
        return [self.presentedViewController topVisibleViewController];
    }
    else if (self.childViewControllers.count > 0)
    {
        return [self.childViewControllers.lastObject topVisibleViewController];
    }

    return self;
}
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Here is what worked for me.

I found that sometimes the controller was nil on the key window, as the keyWindow is some OS thing like an alert, etc.

 + (UIViewController*)topMostController
 {
     UIWindow *topWndow = [UIApplication sharedApplication].keyWindow;
     UIViewController *topController = topWndow.rootViewController;

     if (topController == nil)
     {
         // The windows in the array are ordered from back to front by window level; thus,
         // the last window in the array is on top of all other app windows.
         for (UIWindow *aWndow in [[UIApplication sharedApplication].windows reverseObjectEnumerator])
         {
             topController = aWndow.rootViewController;
             if (topController)
                 break;
         }
     }

     while (topController.presentedViewController) {
         topController = topController.presentedViewController;
     }

     return topController;
 }
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@implementation UIWindow (Extensions)

- (UIViewController*) topMostController
{
    UIViewController *topController = [self rootViewController];

    while (topController.presentedViewController) {
        topController = topController.presentedViewController;
    }

    return topController;
}

@end
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I don't think you satisfied the condition stated in the original post. –  Hot Licks Aug 3 '12 at 23:08

If the root controller is a navigation controller, correct way to find top visible controller is:

UIViewController *rootVC = [[UIApplication sharedApplication] keyWindow].rootViewController;
if ([rootVC respondsToSelector:@selector(visibleViewController)])
{
    UIViewController *topVC = [(UINavigationController *)rootVC visibleViewController];
    // do your thing with topVC
}

Here's an excerpt from UINavigationController.h:

@property(nonatomic,readonly,retain) UIViewController *topViewController; // The top view controller on the stack.
@property(nonatomic,readonly,retain) UIViewController *visibleViewController; // Return modal view controller if it exists. Otherwise the top view controller.
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This works great for finding the top viewController 1 from any root view controlle

+ (UIViewController *)topViewControllerFor:(UIViewController *)viewController
{
    if(!viewController.presentedViewController)
        return viewController;
    return [MF5AppDelegate topViewControllerFor:viewController.presentedViewController];
}

/* View Controller for Visible View */

AppDelegate *app = [UIApplication sharedApplication].delegate;
UIViewController *visibleViewController = [AppDelegate topViewControllerFor:app.window.rootViewController]; 
share|improve this answer
    
But what if you don't have a pointer to a view controller??? –  Hot Licks Feb 26 at 12:37

Not sure if this will help what you're trying to accomplish by finding the topmost view controller, but I was trying to present a new view controller, but if my root view controller already had a modal dialog, it would be blocked, so I would cycle to the top of all modal view controllers using this code:

UIViewController* parentController =[UIApplication sharedApplication].keyWindow.rootViewController;

while( parentController.presentedViewController &&
       parentController != parentController.presentedViewController )
{
    parentController = parentController.presentedViewController;
}
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you could find the top most view controller by using

NSArray *arrViewControllers=[[self navigationController] viewControllers];
UIViewController *topMostViewController=(UIViewController *)[arrViewControllers objectAtIndex:[arrViewControllers count]-1];
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Except that, if you actually read the question, self has no navigationController property. –  Hot Licks Feb 26 at 12:35
    
Ohh sorry I missed that... –  Tapas Pal Feb 26 at 13:04

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