Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I would like to determine whether or not a file has any dependencies to the .net framework. The catch: I want to do this without the use of any third party application.

I was hoping there was some hidden method in existence that I could use for this.

Thanks for any help, Evan

share|improve this question
6  
By virtue of being c# I think it has .net as a dependency – Woot4Moo May 25 '11 at 23:47
    
Outside of any additional context, A "file" doesn't have a dependency to anything. Are you referring to determining whether a .dll or .exe is native versus .NET? – Ethan Cabiac May 25 '11 at 23:52
    
@Ethan Yes, I'm sorry I didn't specify that. – user725913 May 25 '11 at 23:53
    
@Woot4Moo I will be loading VB6 executables, C# executables etc. – user725913 May 25 '11 at 23:54
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Something along these lines:

Assembly a = Assembly.LoadFrom(
      pathToAssembly);
   AssemblyName [] an = 
      a.GetReferencedAssemblies();
   foreach (AssemblyName name in an) 
      Console.WriteLine(name.ToString());  

... Courtesy of Determining .NET Assembly and Method References

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is that this code will not work with native files... which is what I need it to do. – user725913 May 25 '11 at 23:55
    
I will use this code, and if an error appears I will know it was not written in .net. Thank you for your help! – user725913 May 26 '11 at 0:06

A .NET executable has special fields in its header that you can look for, but even native EXEs can implicitly rely on .NET, say by invoking a COM service that's written in .NET.

share|improve this answer
    
I see, so I'll need to look into the PE header to find this information? – user725913 May 26 '11 at 0:01

By nature, a C# application will most likely link against the standard C# libraries. If you are talking about another library, outside of the standard libraries, I don't know if that is possible. What exactly do you mean by 'third party' in this situation?

share|improve this answer
    
There are companies that make products for things like this. I didn't want to have to use that, i wanted to do it through code. – user725913 May 25 '11 at 23:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.