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I just learned Ruby on Rails,and to advance my skills i am trying to build a large web application .But to this day i am really confused about unit test and functional test(i dont know how to write them).My question is for now can i start building the app and and test the the app by using real data on the browser (as actual user trying to interact with the app)instead of writing test code?(Eventually later on I will have an exepert jump in and help out writing the test code).Thank you in advance

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2 Answers 2

There is one simple truth about unit testing... it is much easy to start unit testing early on in your project. Unit testing becomes more difficult to implement as your application grows more complex.

Check out the following link:

http://guides.rubyonrails.org/testing.html

You can find general information on the how/why of unit testing for RoR.

Thanks,

Tom

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One of the benefits of writing Unit Tests while in the course of developing the application is that it will help keep your code of a high quality. It is often extremely difficult to impossible to effectively apply Unit Tests to a poorly written code base. Even if you wouldn't consider the code to be of poor quality, it may not be of the standard necessary for someone to write unit tests against it.

If you are serious about writing unit tests, it is often considered acceptable practice to write a "walking skeleton" - the smallest amount of code possible to get the application in a runnable state, before writing a unit test. However, the longer you wait after that to write your first tests the more likely you will be to never have any tests at all.

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